of Historic Roswell
200 Pine Grove Rd, Roswell, GA 30075 • (770) 642-1900

Blog

  • Giving Back With Your Preschooler

    If you are looking for some fun, family-friendly ways in which you can give back in and around your community, we’ve got some ideas for you! Our friends at ... Read More

    If you are looking for some fun, family-friendly ways in which you can give back in and around your community, we’ve got some ideas for you! Our friends at Atlanta Moms published this article for us so we can all chip in and make a difference together!

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  • Kids ‘R’ Kids Magazine September 2017

    Back to school! New classes, new teachers, new friends…new magazine! Take a break from your back to school routine and browse our new issue! We’ve got some tips to help all of you parents t... Read More

    September 2017 Magazine

    Back to school! New classes, new teachers, new friends…new magazine! Take a break from your back to school routine and browse our new issue! We’ve got some tips to help all of you parents to get your children to practice their musical instruments and some insight for you on teaching your child to learn through failure. These articles will be worth the read!

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  • Kids ‘R’ Kids Magazine August 2017

    The summer is winding down, and school time is just around the corner! We’ve published one more magazine for you to enjoy before you trade in your bathing suits for backpacks! In thi... Read More

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Magazine August 2017

    The summer is winding down, and school time is just around the corner! We’ve published one more magazine for you to enjoy before you trade in your bathing suits for backpacks! In this issue you will learn how to identify symptoms of Sensory Processing Disorder, and how you can help a child struggling with it. You will also find an article on developing communication skills and emotional intelligence in your child.

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  • Finding the Right Preschool for Your Child

    Finding the perfect preschool for your child can be an overwhelming and daunting task. An exceptional early education program can put your preschooler on the path to success, but how do you know what to look for when sea... Read More

    Atlanta Moms- Finding the Right Preschool for Your Child

    Finding the perfect preschool for your child can be an overwhelming and daunting task. An exceptional early education program can put your preschooler on the path to success, but how do you know what to look for when searching for the right school? There are countless factors to consider, and we’ve narrowed it down to six key components.

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  • July 2017 Magazine

    It is hot outside! Grab a cold beverage and kick back for a while as you peruse the  July edition of the Kids ‘R’ Kids Magazine! This month you will find articles on “Why Kids with Hobbies do Better in School” and “The Im... Read More

    July 2017 Digital Magazine

    It is hot outside! Grab a cold beverage and kick back for a while as you peruse the  July edition of the Kids ‘R’ Kids Magazine! This month you will find articles on “Why Kids with Hobbies do Better in School” and “The Importance of Traditional Play in a Digital World.” Sounds like a good read to us!

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  • June 2017 Digital Magazine

    Are you ready for a little summer reading? We’ve published a new edition of the Kids ‘R’ Kids Digital Magazine! In the June edition you will find some DIY gift ideas for Father’s Day (no peeki... Read More

    June 2017 Digital Magazine

    Are you ready for a little summer reading? We’ve published a new edition of the Kids ‘R’ Kids Digital Magazine! In the June edition you will find some DIY gift ideas for Father’s Day (no peeking Dads!), good reasons to give your children responsibilities, and ways to be a “light reflector” for your child.

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  • May Edition Digital Magazine

    It’s a new month! That means the new Kids ‘R’ Kids Digital Magazine edition is ready! Take a peek inside the May issue to find ways you can enjoy the spring while preparing for a fun summer, how to keep a child active when he doesn't enjoy team sports, and how you c... Read More

    KRK Magazine May Edition

    It’s a new month! That means the new Kids ‘R’ Kids Digital Magazine edition is ready! Take a peek inside the May issue to find ways you can enjoy the spring while preparing for a fun summer, how to keep a child active when he doesn't enjoy team sports, and how you can incorporate Montessori learning principles in your home.

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  • April Edition Digital Magazine

    The latest Kids ‘R’ Kids Magazine issue is here! Check out this issue for ideas to help nurture your child’s creativity, ways to celebrate Earth Day, and steps parents of multiples can take to recognize unique qualities in each child. Click ... Read More

    April Edition Digital Magazine

    The latest Kids ‘R’ Kids Magazine issue is here! Check out this issue for ideas to help nurture your child’s creativity, ways to celebrate Earth Day, and steps parents of multiples can take to recognize unique qualities in each child. Click here to see more.

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  • The Importance of Sleep for Preschool Children

    A preschool child’s sleep is one of the most important topics when we talk about development. Getting enough sleep will improve your child’s mood and educational performance dramatically.

    Read “The Importance of Sleep for Preschool Children” on Atlanta Moms.

    A preschool child’s sleep is one of the most important topics when we talk about development. Getting enough sleep will improve your child’s mood and educational performance dramatically.

    Read “The Importance of Sleep for Preschool Children” on Atlanta Moms.

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  • March Edition Digital Magazine

    The latest Kids ‘R’ Kids Magazine issue is here! Check out this issue for tips on helping children find their passion, fun St. Patrick’s Day recipes, and ways to incorporate fun and play into everyday activities! Click ... Read More

    March Edition of the Kids 'R' Kids Digital Magazine Is Here!

    The latest Kids ‘R’ Kids Magazine issue is here! Check out this issue for tips on helping children find their passion, fun St. Patrick’s Day recipes, and ways to incorporate fun and play into everyday activities! Click here for the latest issue. 

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  • February Edition Digital Magazine

    The latest Kids ‘R’ Kids Magazine issue is here! Check out this issue for tips on President’s Day activities, raising a problem solver, and learn mor... Read More

    February Edition of the Kids 'R' Kids Digital Magazine Is Here!

    The latest Kids ‘R’ Kids Magazine issue is here! Check out this issue for tips on President’s Day activities, raising a problem solver, and learn more about keys qualities for early success!

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  • How to Establish Traditions with Your Family

    Now that the holiday season is over, it’s a great time to think about establishing new traditions for your family. Traditions are vital for human flourishing, even as young as preschool age. We need repetitive, even sacred, rituals to remember what’s important in our lives. Here are some traditions to try to incorporate over the coming year.

    Read “How to Establish Traditions with Your Family” on US Family Guide.

    Now that the holiday season is over, it’s a great time to think about establishing new traditions for your family. Traditions are vital for human flourishing, even as young as preschool age. We need repetitive, even sacred, rituals to remember what’s important in our lives. Here are some traditions to try to incorporate over the coming year.

    Read “How to Establish Traditions with Your Family” on US Family Guide.

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  • New Year's Resolutions with Children

    January is the time to set goals, keep resolutions, and try to be better in the coming year. It’s no different with preschool children, but how do you keep them on track with their goals?

    Read “New Year’s Resolutions with Children” on Atlanta Moms.

    January is the time to set goals, keep resolutions, and try to be better in the coming year. It’s no different with preschool children, but how do you keep them on track with their goals?

    Read “New Year’s Resolutions with Children” on Atlanta Moms.

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  • January Edition Digital Magazine

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies are always on the cutting edge of early childhood education. From our highly trained teachers to our exclusive preschool curriculum, you can count on us to provide your child with the best preschool... Read More

    January Edition of the Kids 'R' Kids Digital Magazine Is Here!

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies are always on the cutting edge of early childhood education. From our highly trained teachers to our exclusive preschool curriculum, you can count on us to provide your child with the best preschool or childcare experience. Our latest digital magazine is out! Check out this issue for tips on avoiding post-holiday blues, fostering creativity, and the benefits of music lessons!

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  • Holiday Recipes with Children

    Cooking can be fun, especially for preschool children. There’s no doubt about it. Put on some holiday music and dance and sing while you and your child create wonderful memories together.

    Read “Holiday Recipes with Children” on Atlanta Moms.

    Cooking can be fun, especially for preschool children. There’s no doubt about it. Put on some holiday music and dance and sing while you and your child create wonderful memories together.

    Read “Holiday Recipes with Children” on Atlanta Moms.

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  • Winter Crafts and Activities for Children

    When you’re stuck inside during winter break, sometimes you need ideas for things to do, especially if you’re a preschooler. The movies and games grow old and your child just wants something fun to do.

    Read “Winter Crafts and Activities for Children” on US Family Guide.

    When you’re stuck inside during winter break, sometimes you need ideas for things to do, especially if you’re a preschooler. The movies and games grow old and your child just wants something fun to do.

    Read “Winter Crafts and Activities for Children” on US Family Guide.

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  • December Edition Digital Magazine

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies focus on child care, teacher care, family care and facility care to ensure each day is a great day! It was founded on the realization that children should be “hugged first, then taught.” Our accredited programs incorporate science, tech... Read More

    Kids R Kids Magazine December

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies focus on child care, teacher care, family care and facility care to ensure each day is a great day! It was founded on the realization that children should be “hugged first, then taught.” Our accredited programs incorporate science, technology, engineering, art & math. Learn more about us in our latest digital magazine! Check out this issue for tips on disciplining your kids, getting them to eat healthier, and learn more about the strategies we use within our Brain Waves℠ curriculum!

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  • How to Teach Kids to Be Giving

    Preschool children are naturally good at giving. Well, they’re naturally good at giving when they have a little help. Parents can help their children by showing them how to give. Show them how it’s done. In other words, to give the gift of giving, give them an example!

    Read “How to Teach Kids to Be Giving” on US Family Guide.

    Preschool children are naturally good at giving. Well, they’re naturally good at giving when they have a little help. Parents can help their children by showing them how to give. Show them how it’s done. In other words, to give the gift of giving, give them an example!

    Read “How to Teach Kids to Be Giving” on US Family Guide.

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  • Parents Make Mistakes Too

    Everyone makes mistakes. This goes without saying. If you’re human—and odds are good—then you’ve probably made a mistake or two along the way. Either way, one day you’ll have to communicate these mistakes to preschool-age child. But how do you do that? How do you appear on the one hand to be the all-knowing, all-wise parent, yet on the other hand find yourself asking other moms and dads how they may have handled the situation. Rest easy. We’ve all been there. Read “... Read More

    Everyone makes mistakes. This goes without saying. If you’re human—and odds are good—then you’ve probably made a mistake or two along the way. Either way, one day you’ll have to communicate these mistakes to preschool-age child.

    But how do you do that? How do you appear on the one hand to be the all-knowing, all-wise parent, yet on the other hand find yourself asking other moms and dads how they may have handled the situation. Rest easy. We’ve all been there.

    Read “Parents Make Mistakes Too” on Atlanta Moms.

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  • Healthy before the Holidays

    It’s almost hibernation time. When it’s the middle of winter, there’s nothing better than wrapping up with a big fat blanket and a tub of ice cream on the couch. We’re packing on the pounds and staying warm, and tossing our thoughts of summer in the sink with our ice cream spoon. Instead of ice cream, though, children could use an extra boost of nutritious food during the holidays when they’re not at preschool. They’re filled with energy, and they need healthy food to convert that energy into precious nutrients their bo... Read More

    It’s almost hibernation time. When it’s the middle of winter, there’s nothing better than wrapping up with a big fat blanket and a tub of ice cream on the couch. We’re packing on the pounds and staying warm, and tossing our thoughts of summer in the sink with our ice cream spoon.

    Instead of ice cream, though, children could use an extra boost of nutritious food during the holidays when they’re not at preschool. They’re filled with energy, and they need healthy food to convert that energy into precious nutrients their bodies need. They also need to expel this energy and nutrients in healthy ways, but sometimes it’s hard to play outside during the winter.

    Read “Healthy before the Holidays” on US Family Guide.

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  • November Edition Digital Magazine

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies focus on child care, teacher care, family care and facility care to ensure each day is a great day! It was founded on the realization that children should be “hugged first, then taught.” Our a... Read More

    November Edition of the Kids 'R' Kids Digital Magazine Is Here!

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies focus on child care, teacher care, family care and facility care to ensure each day is a great day! It was founded on the realization that children should be “hugged first, then taught.” Our accredited programs incorporate science, technology, engineering, art & math. Learn more about us in  our latest digital magazine! Check out this issue for tips on disciplining your kids, getting them to eat healthier, and learn more about the strategies we use within our Brain Waves℠ curriculum!

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  • October Edition Digital Magazine

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies are always on the cutting edge of early childhood education. From our highly trained teachers to our exclusive preschool curriculum, you can count on us to provide your child with the best preschool or childcare experience. Our latest digital magazine is out! Check out this issue for tips on listening to music with childr... Read More

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies are always on the cutting edge of early childhood education. From our highly trained teachers to our exclusive preschool curriculum, you can count on us to provide your child with the best preschool or childcare experience. Our latest digital magazine is out! Check out this issue for tips on listening to music with children, details about our winter camps, and how setting good boundaries with children is one of the healthiest things you can do!

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  • September Edition Digital Magazine

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies are always on the cutting – edge of early childhood education; from our highly trained teachers to our exclusive preschool curriculum, you can count on us to provide your child with the best p... Read More

    September Edition of the Kids 'R' Kids Digital Magazine is Here!

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies are always on the cutting – edge of early childhood education; from our highly trained teachers to our exclusive preschool curriculum, you can count on us to provide your child with the best preschool or childcare experience. A part of our commitment to serve our families well is by providing resources that will equip parents with tools and information to use along the parenting journey. Take a peek inside of our latest digital magazine for tips on Check out our latest digital magazine for tips on learning mathematics, how to deal with whining, and parenting during transitions!

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  • August Edition Digital Magazine

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies are always on the cutting edge of early childhood education; from our highly trained teachers to our exclusive preschool curriculum, you can count on us to provide your child with the best preschool or childcare experience. A part of our commitment to serve our families well i... Read More

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies are always on the cutting edge of early childhood education; from our highly trained teachers to our exclusive preschool curriculum, you can count on us to provide your child with the best preschool or childcare experience. A part of our commitment to serve our families well is by providing resources that will equip parents with tools and information to use along the parenting journey. Inside this month’s issue you can explore information on a baby’s language development, how children build relationships, and how to properly, constructively help your child!

    August Digital Magazine

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  • Roswell, GA Daycare: The Benefits of Educational Technology for Preschoolers

    Since living in a technological age, the question regarding how much is too much or how the benefits of educational technology impacts our children has been buzzing around many parents’ minds. There are so many helpful tools and resources to enhance your child’s early education and technology plays a big role in many of them. Check out this article to learn more about ... Read More

    Since living in a technological age, the question regarding how much is too much or how the benefits of educational technology impacts our children has been buzzing around many parents’ minds. There are so many helpful tools and resources to enhance your child’s early education and technology plays a big role in many of them. Check out this article to learn more about the benefits of educational technology for your preschooler.

    Do Preschoolers Benefit from Educational Technology?

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  • Roswell, GA Preschool: July Edition Digital Magazine

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies are always on the cutting – edge of early childhood education; from our highly trained teachers to our exclusive preschool curriculum, you can count on us to provide your child with the best preschool or childcare experience. A part of our commitment to serve our families well is by... Read More

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies are always on the cutting – edge of early childhood education; from our highly trained teachers to our exclusive preschool curriculum, you can count on us to provide your child with the best preschool or childcare experience. A part of our commitment to serve our families well is by providing resources that will equip parents with tools and information to use along the parenting journey. Take a peek inside of our latest digital magazine for tips on how to manage young children while shopping, how to differentiate effective and ineffective discipline methods for your child, and more!

    July Digital Magazine 

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  • Roswell, GA Childcare: How to Survive the Summer Birthday Boom

    Summer is in full swing and this season usually means at least half-a-dozen birthdays are on the calendar for your preschooler or toddler. Attending birthday parties is an excellent environment for teaching your child the importance of celebrating others; but how do you handle the summer birthday boom without going completely crazy? And what if your child has a summer birt... Read More

    Summer is in full swing and this season usually means at least half-a-dozen birthdays are on the calendar for your preschooler or toddler. Attending birthday parties is an excellent environment for teaching your child the importance of celebrating others; but how do you handle the summer birthday boom without going completely crazy? And what if your child has a summer birthday – how do you plan that on top of the rest of the summer festivities? Check out this article for ways you can handle the birthday boom while still enjoying the carefree days of summer.

    How to Handle the Summer Birthday Boom

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  • Roswell, GA Preschool: Keeping Cool this Summer

    The summer has arrived and with it – lots of hot, hot, hot weather! How will you stay cool this summer? From garden hoses to water balloons, there are endless opportunities to make cooling off an entertaining, memorable family affair. Your preschooler and toddler are sure to love some of the ideas in this article, check it out and keep cool all summer long!... Read More

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    The summer has arrived and with it – lots of hot, hot, hot weather! How will you stay cool this summer? From garden hoses to water balloons, there are endless opportunities to make cooling off an entertaining, memorable family affair. Your preschooler and toddler are sure to love some of the ideas in this article, check it out and keep cool all summer long!

    Fun Outdoor Activities to Stay Cool This Summer

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  • Roswell, GA Daycare: Pool Safety for the Summer

    Pool safety is a primary concern for many parents as the summer season kicks off! The best way to prepare for pool safety is to have clear boundaries, constant supervision, and children who are able to practice water safety skills when around a pool or other large body of water. Check out this article for how to make your next pool party a safe one!... Read More

    Pool safety is a primary concern for many parents as the summer season kicks off! The best way to prepare for pool safety is to have clear boundaries, constant supervision, and children who are able to practice water safety skills when around a pool or other large body of water. Check out this article for how to make your next pool party a safe one!

    Summer Pool Tips

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  • Roswell, GA Childcare: June Edition Digital Magazine

    From fun Father's Day gift ideas and creative games to understanding the importance of play in your child’s life, the June edition of the Kids 'R' Kids Learning Academy of Historic R... Read More

    From fun Father's Day gift ideas and creative games to understanding the importance of play in your child’s life, the June edition of the Kids 'R' Kids Learning Academy of Historic Roswell  digital magazine provides information on family-friendly summertime fun and more.

    Don’t forget to check back for every new monthly edition for more tips on parenting, child development, and all things preschool!

    Click here to read now!

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  • Kids 'R' Kids Historic Roswell: Prepare Your Child for Kindergarten with this Checklist

    It’s your child’s first educational milestone – her preschool graduation! As you take hundreds of pictures, you can’t help but wipe away happy tears from your eyes. Your little one is growing up, and quickly! But is she ready for kindergarten?Many parents of young children struggle with anxiety when it comes to their child’s educational and social prepare... Read More

    It’s your child’s first educational milestone – her preschool graduation! As you take hundreds of pictures, you can’t help but wipe away happy tears from your eyes. Your little one is growing up, and quickly! But is she ready for kindergarten?

    Many parents of young children struggle with anxiety when it comes to their child’s educational and social preparedness for the next grade level. It’s easy to get caught up in the whirlwind of a new school, new teachers and new expectations for learning. You may be asking, “Does my child know all that she needs to know?” “Will she handle the transition well?” “How can I prepare her best for kindergarten?” To help you determine if your child is ready to step out of the preschool classroom and enter kindergarten, we’ve prepared a checklist for you. Use this checklist as a tool to test whether your child has mastered the skills necessary to step into kindergarten equipped for success. But, don’t worry too much if your child doesn’t get an A+ on the test. Progress is just as important as competence!

    To view the checklist, read the full article here: Prepare Your Child for Kindergarten with this Checklist

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  • Outdoor Activities That Are Anything But Boring

    As the grass dries out and the weather gets warmer, take your children outside to run around, play, and soak up the sunshine. There are many options for outdoor activities – but some of them take a little bit more planning and creativity. Here are a few outdoor activities that require very minimal planning and preparation.Whatever you choose to do with your childr... Read More

    As the grass dries out and the weather gets warmer, take your children outside to run around, play, and soak up the sunshine. There are many options for outdoor activities – but some of them take a little bit more planning and creativity. Here are a few outdoor activities that require very minimal planning and preparation.

    Whatever you choose to do with your children, remember that quality time spent with them is more important than the activity that you actually end up doing!

    Plan a scavenger hunt.

    Before you go out to your favorite park or nature area, make a list of items for your child to find or do when you get there. It can be as easy as “Find a tree with flowers on it,” “Find a dandelion,” or “Do 10 jumping jacks!” The goal is to keep your child occupied and active! If you want to encourage some healthy competition, set a timer and reward the child who gets done with the scavenger hunt first!

    Pitch a tent and have a “camp out” in the backyard.

    If you have a backyard, take your kids outside for a “camp out.” Pitch a tent, bring out some sandwiches and lemonade, and pretend you’re in the middle of a forest. When it gets dark, look for shooting stars, and maybe even tell spooky stories!

    For more outdoor activity ideas, check out the full article here: Outdoor Activities That Are Anything But Boring

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  • May Edition of the Kids ‘R’ Kids Digital Magazine is Here!

    The new Kids ‘R’ Kids digital magazine for the month of May is here! As an effort to spread the word about all of the unique benefits and state-of-the-art technology we have to offer, this magazine is a great go-to for current and new families. At Kids ‘R’ Kids L... Read More

    The new Kids ‘R’ Kids digital magazine for the month of May is here! As an effort to spread the word about all of the unique benefits and state-of-the-art technology we have to offer, this magazine is a great go-to for current and new families. At Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academies, our hope is to provide your child with only the best in care, education, and nurturing.

    This month’s edition includes helpful tips and tricks for successful parenting and child development. The issue features helpful articles on the value of problem solving skills, as well as the importance of giving each individual child space to grow and learn at his or her pace without comparison to other children. No doubt, you will be encouraged to love and care for your children in a way that stimulates their learning and development!

    In addition to helpful articles, you will find information about different school programs and activities your children can get involved in. This month you can learn more about our exciting Summer Camp 2016 program!

    As you flip through this month’s edition of the digital magazine, remember to keep an eye out for the Kids ‘R’ Kids digital magazine every month! Each edition will highlight new areas of parenting and early education that will help equip you as you continue on the exciting and challenging journey of parenthood and early childhood education!

    So go ahead! Take a peek inside our magazine! And, feel free to share it with your friends! As always, our door is open to your comments, questions and suggestions as we work together to provide your child with a firm foundation in early learning. Contact us today!

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  • Tips for a Grumpy-Free Picnic with Kids

    Spending time outdoors before it gets unbearably hot is a great option for some quality family time. Even if you have little ones, you can make an outdoor adventure a day that everyone enjoys. The best way to ensure a fun experience for your family is by planning ahead. Any time you leave the house with your kiddos, a great rule of thumb is to keep the outing as simple as... Read More

    Spending time outdoors before it gets unbearably hot is a great option for some quality family time. Even if you have little ones, you can make an outdoor adventure a day that everyone enjoys. The best way to ensure a fun experience for your family is by planning ahead. Any time you leave the house with your kiddos, a great rule of thumb is to keep the outing as simple as possible. Cramming too many activities in to one afternoon can lead to grumpy children and an exhausted parent.

    1. Location, Location, Location – In the spirit of keeping it simple, have your outdoor adventure on familiar territory. If you are comfortable with the area, it will take a load off of your mind and allow you to enjoy the day more freely. When your kids are older or whenever you are more comfortable to visit a new place, venture out to a local park or zoo for your picnic festivities.

    2. Bring a Friend – Since toddlers and preschoolers always seem to have an inexhaustible amount of energy, it’s a great idea to collaborate with another family so that your children can play together. Not only will your children have a ton of fun together, you will also enjoy some adult conversation while they play – everybody wins! The great outdoors is the perfect place to allow your children to use their imagination, and bringing a friend is sure to create new, unexplored adventures involving space ships and castles and who knows what else!

    For more tips, read the full article here: Tips for a Grumpy-Free Picnic with Kids

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  • Teaching Kids the Importance of Recycling

    Earth Day is here and it’s a great chance to teach your child about the importance of taking care of the environment. There are several ways you can incorporate earth-friendly habits in to your life and one of the easiest is through recycling.The first step to teaching your child about recycling is making it a fun experience! Since recycling involves sorting and ... Read More

    Earth Day is here and it’s a great chance to teach your child about the importance of taking care of the environment. There are several ways you can incorporate earth-friendly habits in to your life and one of the easiest is through recycling.

    The first step to teaching your child about recycling is making it a fun experience! Since recycling involves sorting and containers, it’s the perfect set-up for a basketball game. Line up your recycling bins and have your children practice tossing paper, cardboard, and other lightweight recyclables in to the bin. If you have more than one child, try assigning a particular recyclable item to each child and have them go on a “treasure hunt” around the house and neighborhood looking for his/her specific recyclable item. Reward their efforts with a pre-determined prize (ice cream cone, day at the park, etc.) if they reach a certain goal.

    For more fun ways to get your children excited about recycling, read the full article here: Teaching Kids the Importance of Recycling

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  • 10 Things to Look for in a Leading Preschool

    Childcare centers may be readily available, but they are not all the same. Daycares have different educational philosophies and levels of experience. They hire staff differently, and vary in the amount of training required to give your child the best care possible.The best way to find a leading childcare, daycare or preschool is to find the best location and take a tour of the... Read More

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    Childcare centers may be readily available, but they are not all the same. Daycares have different educational philosophies and levels of experience. They hire staff differently, and vary in the amount of training required to give your child the best care possible.

    The best way to find a leading childcare, daycare or preschool is to find the best location and take a tour of the facility. Before you spend the time taking a tour, here are 10 things to look for in a leading childcare, daycare or preschool:

    1. Accredited Preschool Curriculum

    2. Plenty of room for your child to play indoors and outdoors

    3. A philosophy of learning that includes fun activities

    4. Opportunities for extra-curricular activities

    5. A commitment to safety

    For the rest of the items, read the full article here: 10 Things to Look for in a Leading Preschool

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  • The Benefits of Routine for Toddlers

    There are generally two kinds of parents – those who “wing it” and those who are particular about every particular thing. The particular parents tend to care about structure and are often strict about their child’s routines. The parents who “wing it” tend to respond to all their child’s demands in the mom... Read More

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    There are generally two kinds of parents – those who “wing it” and those who are particular about every particular thing. The particular parents tend to care about structure and are often strict about their child’s routines. The parents who “wing it” tend to respond to all their child’s demands in the moment and are flexible with routines.

    While there is room for parents to be flexible about establishing boundaries and guidelines for their toddlers, routines help toddlers feel comfortable and secure in knowing there is certainty and predictability in their lives. As toddlers grow and develop, they need a strong sense of safety. Routines help toddlers learn how to interact with the world by doing the same things over and over again. The bottom line is that patterns help toddlers learn.

    When there is routine and structure in the home, toddlers tend to be more calm and relaxed. Changes to schedules and routines can be particularly stressful for young children. It is not uncommon for a child who is used to mommy putting him to sleep every night to throw a fuss when the new babysitter tries to do the same thing. Changes in routine make toddlers uncertain and scared because they notice when something is different. Read the full article here: The Benefits of Routine for Toddlers

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  • Easter Egg Hunt Ideas for Toddlers and Preschoolers

    It’s that time of year again. Time for Easter egg hunts! Scouting for brightly colored eggs filled with jellybeans is fun, but did you know it can also be educational? Children of all ages can learn important skills from participating in an egg hunt. Whether you’re planning to go to an egg hunt hosted by your community center or church, or hosting your own, check out these creative ide... Read More

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    It’s that time of year again. Time for Easter egg hunts! Scouting for brightly colored eggs filled with jellybeans is fun, but did you know it can also be educational? Children of all ages can learn important skills from participating in an egg hunt. Whether you’re planning to go to an egg hunt hosted by your community center or church, or hosting your own, check out these creative ideas to keep your child’s body and mind healthy and active!

    While some of the ideas work better for toddlers or preschoolers, all children can learn healthy competition from participating in an Easter egg hunt. Before your children participate in an egg hunt, remind them to be kind and respectful to other children participating. Teach your children to be competitive without being mean. Remind children that collecting the most eggs is not the point of the activity. Having fun is!

    Read the full article here: Easter Egg Hunt Ideas for Toddlers and Preschoolers

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  • Have a Date Night with the Whole Family

    Finding some much needed “just us” time is an important part of maintaining a healthy relationship with your spouse or significant other. But spending fun and quality time together with the whole family is also crucial! The recipe for a successful “at home family date night” is simple, easy and affordable. Start with yummy food, throw in a fun activity that can be ... Read More

    Finding some much needed “just us” time is an important part of maintaining a healthy relationship with your spouse or significant other. But spending fun and quality time together with the whole family is also crucial! The recipe for a successful “at home family date night” is simple, easy and affordable. Start with yummy food, throw in a fun activity that can be enjoyed by every family member, and wrap it up with a family movie night complete with PJ’s and popcorn!

    Creating positive childhood memories helps establish a safe and firm foundation for your child as they continue to learn and grow. While it may seem like you have to pull out all the stops to create a family night that won’t have eyes rolling (if that’s even possible?) the simpler and easier you make the planning on yourself, the more likely you’ll find yourself enjoying the night! When tantrums or fights break out – deal with them as best you can but make an effort to not let it ruin the night. No family is perfect but spending time together as a family is an excellent way of reminding your children that they are a part of a family unit that loves and appreciates them!

    Check out this helpful article on more tips for throwing a fun family date night!

    Have a Date Night with the Whole Family

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  • Simple Ways to Expand Your Child's Learning and Development

    When a child is born she immediately begins the process of learning and adapting to the world. Many skills come very instinctively to a child such as swallowing, eating, laughing, and crying. For the majority of a child’s life, however, she will need the help of others around her to explain important concepts and demonstrate healthy social skills.One of the most e... Read More

    When a child is born she immediately begins the process of learning and adapting to the world. Many skills come very instinctively to a child such as swallowing, eating, laughing, and crying. For the majority of a child’s life, however, she will need the help of others around her to explain important concepts and demonstrate healthy social skills.

    One of the most effective ways to establish a solid educational foundation at an early age is by enrolling your child in an elite preschool or childcare facility. Learning can also be enhanced and encouraged at home as well and parental involvement plays a key role in making this happen. From making conversation to including your child in household chores, there are many ways you can invite your child into a learning experience.

    Taking the time to understand what your child’s preschool teacher is teaching in class can also help you find creative ways to continue the learning at home. Your child will take notice of your interest in her education and may even find herself enjoying school more when you are excited about it too!

    Check out this article for more tips on how you can be a part of expanding your child’s learning!

    Simple Ways to Expand Your Child’s Learning and Development

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  • Teaching Your Child About Money

    Teaching your preschool children about money starts with them watching you handle money.Wise money management is a skill that children learn from parents. With activities as simple as managing their own allowance to counting coins from a parent’s pocket, children can learn valuable financial principles to help them begin a journey of wise money management.... Read More

    Teaching your preschool children about money starts with them watching you handle money.

    Wise money management is a skill that children learn from parents. With activities as simple as managing their own allowance to counting coins from a parent’s pocket, children can learn valuable financial principles to help them begin a journey of wise money management.

    Children enjoy watching and learning from parents when they get to share in decisions and simple conversations. Preschool children can learn how to count, save, and decide whether to buy a toy, a piece of candy, or save.

    Here are some excellent ideas that you will find useful for teaching your child about money.

    Teaching Your Child About Money

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  • Kitchen Safety for Children

    Including your child in household activities can sometimes be tricky but the rewards of shared memories and learned skills make the mess all worth it! One of the easiest places to create a mess and clean it back up is in the kitchen. Children can learn a lot about the importance of healthy eating, meal preparation, and family time when you invite them to help you prepare a... Read More

    Including your child in household activities can sometimes be tricky but the rewards of shared memories and learned skills make the mess all worth it! One of the easiest places to create a mess and clean it back up is in the kitchen. Children can learn a lot about the importance of healthy eating, meal preparation, and family time when you invite them to help you prepare a snack or meal. Obviously there are also safety concerns to consider when in the kitchen, especially when sharp objects are near by. Refer to this article for tips on keeping a kid-friendly kitchen while creating memories with your little chefs.

    Kitchen Safety for Children

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  • Teaching Your Child to be Giving and Grateful

    With the holidays behind us and the New Year ahead, it can be easy for children (and adults!) to fall into a slump and have wintertime blues. The shorter days and longer nights with no fun or festive days in sight can make for a rough time of year. But it’s important to cultivate and demonstrate an attitude of gratitude year-round. Your children are always looking to you... Read More

    With the holidays behind us and the New Year ahead, it can be easy for children (and adults!) to fall into a slump and have wintertime blues. The shorter days and longer nights with no fun or festive days in sight can make for a rough time of year. But it’s important to cultivate and demonstrate an attitude of gratitude year-round. Your children are always looking to you to determine how to treat others and what to prioritize. Check out this article for creative ways you can teach your children the importance of being generous and gracious.

    Teaching Your Child to be Giving and Grateful

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  • How Your Family Can Help Others During the Holidays

    During the holidays, many children enjoy an array of gifts and tasty treats, others are not so fortunate. One way to extend the joy is to create an opportunity for your family to help others.A new year offers an excellent opportunity to begin teaching your children how to give more and learn to help others. With so many people in need, there are many ways to get in... Read More

    During the holidays, many children enjoy an array of gifts and tasty treats, others are not so fortunate. One way to extend the joy is to create an opportunity for your family to help others.

    A new year offers an excellent opportunity to begin teaching your children how to give more and learn to help others. With so many people in need, there are many ways to get involved as a family.

    Here are some excellent ideas to keep the holiday giving alive throughout the year.

    How Your Family Can Help Others During the Holidays

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  • How Preschool Can Benefit Your Child

    An excellent foundation, better communication and social skills, and opportunities for increased creativity - those are just a few of the many advantages of attending a quality, accredited preschool.Preschool parents make many sacrifices to give their children the absolute best experience in daycare and childcare. In preschool, children receive an advance... Read More

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    An excellent foundation, better communication and social skills, and opportunities for increased creativity - those are just a few of the many advantages of attending a quality, accredited preschool.

    Preschool parents make many sacrifices to give their children the absolute best experience in daycare and childcare. In preschool, children receive an advanced and important beginning to an educational experience that prepares for future learning.

    At Kids ‘R’ Kids, we understand our parents commitment to quality education. Our programs, curriculum, staff, and everything we do meets and exceeds the benefits of a preschool education.

    Learn more about the many advantages of a preschool education.

    How Preschool Can Benefit Your Child

    Why it’s important to give your child the best opportunity for engaging in creative learning activities.

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  • Dressing Your Child for Autumn Outdoor Play

    With the cool snap in the air it’s important to remember to dress your children warmly as they play outdoors in leaf piles and pumpkin patches. Fresh air is the perfect atmosphere for some fun memories! Without the proper attire however, playing outside can quickly become uncomfortable and sometimes even dangerous to your child’s health. Read this article for practical, easy ways yo... Read More

    With the cool snap in the air it’s important to remember to dress your children warmly as they play outdoors in leaf piles and pumpkin patches. Fresh air is the perfect atmosphere for some fun memories! Without the proper attire however, playing outside can quickly become uncomfortable and sometimes even dangerous to your child’s health. Read this article for practical, easy ways you can keep the outdoor play going for longer this season by being prepared and dressing appropriately.

    Dressing Your Child for Autumn Outdoor Play

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  • 8 Ways to Involve Your Child with Your Health and Fitness​

    Many parents love to maintain an active and healthy lifestyle. When little ones are introduced into the family it can be quite challenging to incorporate routine exercise into your schedule. This article gives several helpful tips on how you can involve your children in your fitness routine. In addition to regular exercise, a healthy diet can help keep your family looking and feeling t... Read More

    Many parents love to maintain an active and healthy lifestyle. When little ones are introduced into the family it can be quite challenging to incorporate routine exercise into your schedule. This article gives several helpful tips on how you can involve your children in your fitness routine. In addition to regular exercise, a healthy diet can help keep your family looking and feeling their best!

    8 Ways to Involve Your Child with Your Health and Fitness

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  • Preschool Preparation for Your Young Scholar!

    As we gear up for the new academic school year, there are some simple activities a parent can keep in mind to help their new preschooler thrive. Many parents make the mistake of assuming their child won’t develop crucial learning skills or habits until elementary school. At Kids ‘R’ Kids we know that can’t be farther from the truth! The first 5 years of your child’s lif... Read More

    As we gear up for the new academic school year, there are some simple activities a parent can keep in mind to help their new preschooler thrive. Many parents make the mistake of assuming their child won’t develop crucial learning skills or habits until elementary school. At Kids ‘R’ Kids we know that can’t be farther from the truth! The first 5 years of your child’s life are critical to establishing a solid foundation. Read this article to learn more!

    Preschool Preparation for Your Young Scholar!

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  • ​​Helping Your Child Develop a Daily Sleep Routine​

    In the early weeks and months of your child’s life, your life will likely revolve around two things: your baby’s sleeping and eating patterns. Establishing a healthy sleep schedule for your infant is a crucial part of setting your child up for educational and developmental success. At Kids ‘R’ Kids we are passionate about caring for our littlest learners and are co... Read More

    In the early weeks and months of your child’s life, your life will likely revolve around two things: your baby’s sleeping and eating patterns. Establishing a healthy sleep schedule for your infant is a crucial part of setting your child up for educational and developmental success. At Kids ‘R’ Kids we are passionate about caring for our littlest learners and are committed to ensuring they will receive only the best in care and encouragement! Read this helpful article for tips on how you can help your child develop healthy sleep habits at an early age.

    Helping Your Child Develop a Daily Sleep Routine

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  • Ways to Encourage Learning At Home in Your Preschooler

    As a parent, it can seem like a daunting task to introduce your child to the world around him. Helping your preschooler become an avid learner doesn’t have to be a complicated process! This article gives excellent insight into how you can assist your young learner in furthering his education at home.... Read More

    As a parent, it can seem like a daunting task to introduce your child to the world around him. Helping your preschooler become an avid learner doesn’t have to be a complicated process! This article gives excellent insight into how you can assist your young learner in furthering his education at home.

    Fun Activities to Help Your Child Learn at Home

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  • Talking About Financial Challenges With Your Preschooler

    Every family faces some kind of unexpected trial in life, often leading to additional financial pressures. How can you help your young child understand the new circumstances of your family's financial situation? This article gives great practical advice!Hel... Read More

    Every family faces some kind of unexpected trial in life, often leading to additional financial pressures. How can you help your young child understand the new circumstances of your family's financial situation? This article gives great practical advice!

    Helping Your Child Understand Family Financial Challenges

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  • 3 Ways NOT to Spoil Your Kids This Holiday

    The holidays should be a wondrous time of fun, family, and faith – but for some families, the holiday turns into a big case of the “I wants.” If you’re concerned that your kids are “all about the stuff” this holiday season, you’re not alone.I’m Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I’m proud to partner with Kids ‘R’ Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.Today, we’re talking about 3 ways NOT to spoil your kids this holiday season and ensure that you’re not left with a big dos... Read More

    The holidays should be a wondrous time of fun, family, and faith – but for some families, the holiday turns into a big case of the “I wants.” If you’re concerned that your kids are “all about the stuff” this holiday season, you’re not alone.

    I’m Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I’m proud to partner with Kids ‘R’ Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.

    Today, we’re talking about 3 ways NOT to spoil your kids this holiday season and ensure that you’re not left with a big dose of entitlement into the New Year.

    1. Control what you CAN control! Let’s face it, companies spend a lot of money in advertising to woo your kids and make them believe they can’t live without the latest and greatest toy, game or electronics. It’s understandable why kids beg and plead as you make your way down the toy aisle.

    Unfortunately, you can’t control how advertisers market to kids – but you can control how much exposure your kids have to those advertisements. Limiting how much time they spend in front of the TV from now through the holidays will limit (not eliminate) the exposure they have to all of the latest and greatest ads intended to entice our kids.

    2. Manage the gift expectations. Talk to your kids about their wish lists, and have them force rank the gifts they love the most. Then, set a limit. If you celebrate Hanukkah, one gift on each of the 8 nights makes it easy. If you celebrate Christmas, set a limit either in the number of gifts for younger kids or a dollar amount for older kids.

    Also, try to make an agreement with extended family to purchase only one gift per child. (That can be tricky, but if the whole family is on board, Grandma may be more likely to go along this year.)

    3. Focus on the real meaning of the holiday. Gifts are one part of the holiday experience, but teach your kids WHY you celebrate that holiday. What does it mean to your faith? Help them discover why gifts are part of the holiday celebration and what they represent. Then, shift the focus to giving.

    Spend the majority of your holiday preparations on the joy of giving to others. Encourage your kids to create gifts for family and friends, or encourage them to give non-material gifts like coupons for breakfast in bed, a weekend of yard work, a back massage – what ever would be meaningful to the recipient. Of course, you can adopt a family through your place of worship or school and get everyone involved in making the holiday more special for that family.

    Kids are bombarded with messages about things they “can’t live without.” It’s our job to limit their exposure to those messages and then shift the focus from GETTING to GIVING over the holiday season.

    And for ongoing solutions to your parenting challenges, visit us often at kidsrkids.com for the Expert Parenting Advice Series. I’m Amy McCready for Kids ‘R’ Kids, and we wish you a joyous and safe holiday season.

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  • Simple Words to Avoid Power Struggles

    We’ll share the pitfalls of giving “No” and “Don’t” commands and 4 simple communication strategies for positive communication and better results. Making these changes to your communication style will require some effort on your part, but the payoff will be worth it.I’m Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I’m proud to partner with Kids ‘R’ Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.

    Today, we’re talking about&n... Read More

    We’ll share the pitfalls of giving “No” and “Don’t” commands and 4 simple communication strategies for positive communication and better results. Making these changes to your communication style will require some effort on your part, but the payoff will be worth it.

    I’m Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I’m proud to partner with Kids ‘R’ Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.

    Today, we’re talking about Avoiding Power Struggles.

    “Don’t run in the house!” “Don’t chew with your mouth open!” “Don’t talk to me like that!”

    Did you know the average child hears 432 negative comments per day versus 32 positive ones? (Source: Katherine Kvols,Redirecting Children’s Behavior)

    If there were a hidden camera in your house, how many times per day would you catch yourself saying “No” or “Don’t” to your kids?

    Today, we’re talking about how a subtle shift in your communication style can make a big difference in the level of cooperation we get from kids and in how they perceive themselves.

    So what’s wrong with “Don’t run in the house!” or “Don’t leave your towel on the floor!”

    “NO” or “DON’T” commands create several problems, especially for young kids…

    They are confusing! I do an exercise with parents in which I give them a series of “don’t” commands: “don’t sit down, don’t look at me, don’t stand still, don’t look at your neighbor,” and so on. You should see their faces as they try to process the information. They have the “deer-in-the-headlights” look trying to figure out what to do or not do. The same thing happens for kids. “Don’t” commands require a child to “double-process.” He has to think, “Well, what does she NOT want me to do?” and then, “What does she WANT me to DO instead?” “Don’t” commands are very confusing for kids and in turn, deliver poor results.

    They reinforce the negative behavior. Instead of hearing what you want the child to do, she is reminded of what she shouldn’t do. For example, if I said, “You can sit here, but don’t touch your brother,” what do you think is forefront in the child’s mind? Touching her brother! Or “Don’t pick your nails!” This creates a mental image of picking her nails. We want to avoid comments that reinforce the negative behavior. And last but not least…

    NO and DON’T commands are discouraging. If 93% of the feedback you received during the day was negative, you would feel discouraged. That’s how our kids feel. When they constantly hear “no” and “don’t,” it creates a perception that they are “bad.” Of course, we want kids to have a positive, empowered perception of themselves, but our communication doesn’t always reflect that intention.

    So what can we do instead?

    I’m not suggesting we’ll eradicate ALL of the “Don’t” or “No” commands from our communication, but we’ll get better results if we can shift the percentages. Let’s talk about a few strategies we can use to teach kids what we want them to do and be more encouraging in the process. All of these strategies require you to think ahead a bit – but with a little practice, they’ll soon become second nature.

    1. Practice using “DO” commands. You want to calmly state what you want your child to DO. Rather than “Don’t run in the house,” try, “Please use your walking feet in the house.” Rather than “Don’t chew with your mouth open,” try, “Please try to make your lips touch each other when you’re chewing.”

    2. Find opportunities to say YES! It’s quick and easy to give a “NO” response, but try to rephrase your comments to imply "YES." Rather than "No, we don't have time to go to the park today,” try "The park sounds awesome! Would you rather go Wednesday evening or Saturday morning?" Instead of "Don't color on the walls," try (in a calm voice) "You can color on this paper or with sidewalk chalk outside." Rather than "We're not going anywhere until that room is clean!" try "YES, when your room is clean, then we'll leave for the mall. Sounds like fun!" (She still has to clean her room, but it's more encouraging hearing a YES response rather than a NO.)

    3. Thank them in advance. This strategy requires a small leap of faith on your part, but you can thank your child in advance for working on a particular behavior. For example, instead of saying “Please stop getting in and out of your chair,” you can rephrase that and say “Thank you for working hard to keep your bottom on the chair during dinner.” Instead of “Don’t leave your dishes on the counter!” try “Thank you for taking the time to put your dishes in the dishwasher tonight.” Again, it reinforces what we want them to do and assumes they’ll make the appropriate choice. It’s much more encouraging.

    4. Role-play what you want them to do. Young kids love to pretend, and role-play is a great way to teach them how to behave in appropriate ways. If you are tired of seeing your kids chew like farm animals and grab food from each other at the table, role-play appropriate table manners. Invite your kids and their favorite stuffed animal to a party, and practice chewing with lips touching each other and graciously asking each other to pass the potatoes. It will be more fun for all of you, and your kids will be more likely to repeat those behaviors that night at the dinner table.

    Making these changes to your communication style will require some effort on your part, but the payoff will be worth it. Your kids will feel more encouraged, they’ll develop a positive, empowered perception of themselves and you’ll enjoy better cooperation from them.

    Amy McCready is the Founder of Positive Parenting Solutions.

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  • How to Choose the Right Roswell, GA, Preschool for Your Child

    Choosing a preschool for your child is not an easy decision to make. Attending preschool may be the first time that your child will spend extended periods of time in the care of others and a... Read More

    roswell_ga_preschoolChoosing a preschool for your child is not an easy decision to make. Attending preschool may be the first time that your child will spend extended periods of time in the care of others and away from home. Here are a few things that you can do to ensure your child attends the right preschool and receives a strong foundational education.

    Visit the prospective school

    Set an appointment with the school and take a good look around. Visit the classrooms, the play areas and restroom facilities. Observe how teachers interact with students. Is the communication one-way, or does the teacher promote two-way conversations with the children while maintaining control of the environment? Classrooms should be vibrant, bright and child-sized.

    What type of preschool are you looking for?

    Some parents may want a child to attend a more regimented, academic preschool while others may want a more relaxed school that focuses on free play. The best Learning Academies will provide a healthy balance of teacher directed academic activities and child initiated free play. Tell your prospective school what you would like for your child in terms of daily activities. If the program coincides with these desires and expectations, then this school may be a good option.

    How is discipline handled?

    One of the most important questions that you can ask of your prospective preschool is how issues regarding discipline are handled. A calm, positive approach, similar to one you would take at home, would be ideal. Ask about discipline procedures or protocols and observe the classroom to see these procedures in action.

    Contact the childcare professionals at Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academy of Historic Roswell, Georgia, to find out more about our excellent preschool facilities and high quality programs and set your child on the road to success.

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  • Roswell Child Care Professionals Explain What Your Child Learns From You

    Before you send your child off to the first day at preschool or child care, you have already been the first teacher. Many child care experts believe that sound parenting can teach an infant many lessons which prove invaluable later in life. Here are some basic thi... Read More

    childcare_roswell_gaBefore you send your child off to the first day at preschool or child care, you have already been the first teacher. Many child care experts believe that sound parenting can teach an infant many lessons which prove invaluable later in life. Here are some basic things which your infant child can learn from you:

    Love and care

    Studies have shown that infants who grow up in a loving, nurturing environment do better in school than those brought up in a less nurturing household. An infant has no concept of discipline at this tender age, so be careful how you respond. Always speak in a quiet and kind voice and handle your infant with gentle care, so your child will learn to trust.

    Infants learn through imitation

    One of the most important ways that infants learn is through imitation. Infants are very observant and watch everything a parent does. Therefore, be sure your actions reflect what you want your child to learn.

    Learning to speak

    Infants have an amazing capacity to learn complex languages in a short period of time. They are able to recognize their own names at around four months of age and can differentiate between mommy and daddy at around six months. Language skills are learned at home and reading to your infant can help advance the learning process.

    Relationships

    Your infant will also learn how to socialize and interact with others from you and others in the household. Your infant will pick up on your interactions with others, including facial expressions, physical contact and tone of voice.

    Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academy of Historic Roswell offers outstanding child care services. For more information, contact us today.

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  • One Language or Two

    We hear from many parents who either speak more than one language in the home, or who want their child to learn a second language. The questions they ask most often are when the best time to start a second language, and won't my child be confused by trying to learn two languages at the same time?There is some experimental evidence that a child who is exposed to the influence of two languages before she arrives at a fair degree of understanding and proficiency in one language is sometimes delayed in language development. This delay is ... Read More

    We hear from many parents who either speak more than one language in the home, or who want their child to learn a second language. The questions they ask most often are when the best time to start a second language, and won't my child be confused by trying to learn two languages at the same time?

    There is some experimental evidence that a child who is exposed to the influence of two languages before she arrives at a fair degree of understanding and proficiency in one language is sometimes delayed in language development. This delay is not permanent but may be observed particularly when the child starts to talk around the second year. These are differences in bilingualism based on the time and circumstances under which two languages are acquired.

    Some children may regularly hear two different languages spoken at home, depending, perhaps, on the mood of the parent. This is known as compound bilingualism, when a child is exposed to both languages interchangeably. Obviously such children have to learn two different words for every object. As a result of their initial confusion, their development of each language may be delayed, especially in the early stages. Coordinate bilingualism means the child learns two languages but the experiences are quite distinct. The child's parents speak essentially one language at home while the second language is heard from peers and learned at school. The consequence is often deficiency in the use of the second language.

    This does not mean, however, that children cannot learn two languages at the same time. Parents who wish their child to learn a second language, or bilingual parents who speak two languages in the home should consider a workable strategy to simplify the introduction of two languages in early childhood. One idea is to designate specific times or places where each language is to be spoken regularly. This avoids the confusion of switching from one language to another during a given time period. Learning a second language can continue and extend the rich cultural heritage from one's family as well as span the generations.

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  • 5 Strategies To Avoid Mealtime Battles

    Mealtime battles are common with young children and most parental strategies actually escalate power struggles. We’ll reveal 5 helpful strategies to put an end to the battles over broccoli and beans, without becoming short order cooks.I’m Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I’m proud to partner with Kids ‘R’ Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series. Today, we’re talking about mealtime battles. This is one of the challen... Read More

    Mealtime battles are common with young children and most parental strategies actually escalate power struggles. We’ll reveal 5 helpful strategies to put an end to the battles over broccoli and beans, without becoming short order cooks.

    I’m Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I’m proud to partner with Kids ‘R’ Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.

    Today, we’re talking about mealtime battles. This is one of the challenges I hear all the time from parents. They’ll ask, “How do I get my kids to eat what the family eats? How can we get through the meal without a power struggle or meltdown?” Today, we’re going to tackle those questions and give you 5 strategies to avoid mealtime battles with your kids.

    Let’s begin by talking about why mealtime battles happen in the first place. We have to remember that kids have a hard-wired need for power. That means they need to have a sense of independence, free will and some control over their own lives. Actually, the need for autonomy and control over your life applies if you are a toddler, a teen or a senior citizen. However, when you’re a kid, you don’t feel like you have a lot of control because you always have someone else, like us! – calling all the shots. Parents decide what they’ll eat, when they’ll eat, what they’ll wear, and when they’ll go here and there. From their perspective – we call all the shots – so it makes sense that kids battle us at mealtime.

    Mealtime is one of the areas where kids do have legitimate power or control. We can’t MAKE them eat. Period. We can try –but can’t MAKE them eat, and they know it. As a result, mealtime becomes a perfect battleground for a power struggle. The more we coax, prod, beg and encourage night after night, kids find tremendous power in dawdling through their meal or refusing to eat altogether. The harder we push to get them to eat – the bigger the power struggle. It’s their way of saying, “You may think you’re the boss of me, but you’re not.”

    Fortunately, there are things we can do to make mealtime much more enjoyable for everyone.

    1. Involve your kids in meal planning and preparation.

    The more invested your child is in the meal; the more likely he’ll be to eat it. If you allow your kids to have input into the family menus for the week and let them pick, for instance, whether to serve sweet potatoes or steamed carrots, they might actually eat what’s on their plate without the usual struggle. Likewise, it’ll help to give your child a meaningful role in each meal’s preparation. Kids as young as two or three can cut banana slices with a plastic knife for fruit salad and older kids can make the entire salad from start to finish. Let everyone contribute to menu planning and most importantly – get everyone involved in the preparation. Not only will they feel more invested in the meal and be more likely to eat it – but they’ll learn important life skills in the process!

    Other ways to get kids involved and invested:

    Give everyone a job when you go to the grocery store. A grocery list (in words or pictures) for each of your kids will keep everyone busy in the grocery store, teach important lessons about food and shopping and make them more invested in the process.

    Plant something! Even if you don’t have enough space to plant fruits or vegetables, plant a pot of basil or parsley and let your kids be responsible for watering and caring for the herbs. They’ll be thrilled to watch them grow and will be excited when you ask them to “grab a handful of basil” for tomato sauce!

    Michelle Stern, Founder of What’s Cooking and author of the Whole Family Cookbook, recommends these Tools of the Trade for tiny hands…

    Rotary Cheese Grater – this does more than grate cheese, this lets kids grate carrots, zucchini and chocolate while protecting their tender knuckles at the same time.

    Plastic Lettuce Knives – these child-safe knives (like the lettuce knife from Oxo and child-sized knives from Curious Chef) are tough enough to saw through carrots, but aren’t sharp enough to accidentally cut through skin.

    Mini-Muffin Tin – everything is cuter and tastes better when it’s small. Kids love the mini-tins for making anything from muffins to tiny rice crispy treats.

    Small Scoop – this is perfect for the tiny muffin pan, because it allows kids to get uniform scoops every time. They can also use it for scooping cantaloupe, watermelon or teensy balls of ice cream.

    2. Make eating the child’s problem, not yours.

    When kids refuse to eat the family meal on the table, most parents resort to either coaxing them to “just try it,” or becoming frustrated and angry. Believe it or not, both of these reactions are a huge payoff to the child. Kids like the feeling of power they get and are more likely than ever to reject their food in the future.

    Instead, let your child know that you aren’t going to badger or nag anymore about what she eats. Let her know that she is growing up and she can choose to eat what’s served or not. Either way – you are fine with that. However, let her know the kitchen will close at 6:30 p.m. and then that’s it. There will be no snacks or meals served until breakfast. This creates a logical consequence – either she will eat or she will be hungry until the next meal. It becomes HER problem, NOT yours.

    Don’t worry; she’s not going to starve between now and the next meal – but she will be much more likely to eat dinner the next night since she now knows you aren’t going to rescue her with a bag of Goldfish before bed.

    When introducing a new rule or routine, it’s helpful to role play the experience with your child. Once you explain the new “game plan” for mealtime, have some fun with it by role playing what she can expect. Role play how you will clear the table at 6:30 p.m. and discuss how you won’t be serving any snacks before bedtime. Pretend that she’s “starving” at bedtime and encourage her to have a drink of water so her tummy feels better.

    Then, switch roles and allow your child to play Mom or Dad while you dawdle through the meal. This is where the magic happens! Allow your child to remove your plate and explain to you that dinner is over but you’ll have a chance to eat again at breakfast. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to implement new routines when you take time to role play the experience!

    3. Stop any discussion about what or how much she eats.

    Your job as a parent is to plan healthy meals, and it’s wise to include at least one healthy item you know your child will eat. But after that, there’s no need for any discussion: don’t ask him to “try one bite,” don’t encourage him to “eat more” as that will only invite a power struggle.

    Also, resist the urge to praise good eating. Comments like, “you were a good eater tonight” make eating a “performance issue” and lets kids know that it’s a big deal to you – which in turn makes eating a ripe topic for a power struggle.

    Desserts as REWARDS?

    It’s best to avoid using dessert as a reward. (Using rewards in general to motivate behavior is proven to produce negative results – but that’s a topic for another session!)

    Using dessert as a reward sends the message to your kids, “There’s no way I would ever eat this meatloaf and green beans unless there’s the promise of a reward (dessert) at the end! It fosters the attitude that healthy food served during the meal is something to be endured until he can get the yummy food he really wants and can create unhealthy long-term attitudes about food.

    Rather than use dessert as a reward, you can…

    Skip “dessert” all together.

    Serve cut-up fruit or a homemade smoothie as “dessert.”

    Save sweet treats for the weekends and serve only healthy “desserts” through the week.

    4. Avoid “I told you so’s” as you follow through.

    Although it may be tempting to do so, there’s no good reason to deliver a lecture or an “I told you so” when your child is “staaaarving to death” because she didn’t eat her meal- you’ll only make her angry or invite a tantrum. Instead, calmly and firmly tell her, “I’m sure you’ll be fine until your next meal. Sometimes when I’m hungry I drink a big glass of water.” Then stick to your plan – don’t rescue your child from her decision by allowing her a bedtime snack or “just a few crackers to hold her over. Tomorrow night, she’ll be less likely to dawdle through her meal.

    About “I told you sos’s….

    Anytime we use “I told you so” – in words or attitude – it invites resistance from the other person. It implies, “Well, if you would have listened to me in the first place, you wouldn’t be in this mess right now.”

    Kids and adults immediately get defensive when confronted with an “I told you so” attitude and the learning opportunity is lost. Instead of the person learning from the experience, his energy is focused on defending himself from the “I told you so” remark and his anger is directed toward the messenger.

    We can help kids learn important lessons by avoiding the “I told you so’s” and instead allowing the child to learn from the experience. Every parent knows that lectures aren’t effective in teaching important lessons. Kids learn best from the positive and negative consequences of their actions.

    5. Control what you can – the pantry.

    You can’t make your child eat, but you can control what’s available. Keep sugary snacks and junk food out of the house so your kids don’t fill up on the bad stuff instead of eating healthy foods. You can also control when food is available. If you’re hoping your children will eat a good dinner, it’s wise to close the pantry (and the fridge) to “snackers” at least an hour before the meal.

    Other examples of “controlling the pantry” are as follows:

    Keep healthy snack options at a kid-friendly height in the fridge or pantry. Allow your kids to help themselves to those “approved” snack items. It will give them a huge dose of positive power when they don’t have to come to you for permission.

    Prepare small, pre-measured, snack size bags in advance. Instead of letting your kids graze through a half-box of crackers, control portions with pre-measured bags.

    Serve smaller amounts of the less nutritious dinner items so your kids don’t fill up on those and miss out on the healthy foods. For example, serve a small box of macaroni and cheese rather than the “family size” box. That will ensure that the cheesy delight is a “side dish” rather than the full meal for your kids.

    While you can’t force your kids to lovingly wolf down the tuna casserole you prepared, you can do a lot to inspire them to eat healthy meals without the power struggles. It takes a little preparation and a lot of backing off, but pretty soon the battles over veggies and other good stuff will all but disappear.

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  • Dealing with Parental Mistakes

    Questions for Consideration:1. Do you sometimes worry about the mistakes you may make inadvertently as a parent? 2. Do you fret about possible harmful effects your mistakes might have on your child? 3. Have you lost the ability to relax as a parent?These questions need to be addressed because they are of concern to so many parents.Childcare experts surmise that some of the anxiety parents experience is undoubtedly due to being bombarded with media information, sometimes contradictory, about infant child car... Read More

    Questions for Consideration:

    1. Do you sometimes worry about the mistakes you may make inadvertently as a parent?

    2. Do you fret about possible harmful effects your mistakes might have on your child?

    3. Have you lost the ability to relax as a parent?

    These questions need to be addressed because they are of concern to so many parents.

    Childcare experts surmise that some of the anxiety parents experience is undoubtedly due to being bombarded with media information, sometimes contradictory, about infant child care, pre school and school age child development. So we need to consider each of these questions in turn.

    First, do you sometimes worry about the mistakes you may make inadvertently as a parent? Actually, everyone, even professional childcare providers, make mistakes at one time or another. It’s part of being human. So there is no need to be consumed by guilt if you make a mistake from time to time.

    Are you concerned about possible harmful effects your mistakes might have later on your child? Fortunately, most childcare and development experts tell us that a young child is a highly resilient creature. This means that most mistakes generally will not harm your child, provided you are reasonable and are genuinely trying to help him.

    So the important question to ask “When I made that mistake, was I genuinely trying to help my child, or did I do it just for my own convenience?”

    As long as parents continue to strive to do what they think is best for their child, their love, even with some mistakes, will eventually triumph over all else.

    Have you lost the ability to relax as a parent? If so, step back from what you are doing. Give yourself a break so that you can enjoy raising your child.

    By doing yourself this favor, you are also doing your child a favor. Your child needs a relaxed and happy environment in which to grow and develop.

    So if you answered “yes” to the questions at the beginning of this article, we have a threefold message for you:

    1. Realize and accept that you will make mistakes.
    2. Focus your attention on doing what is good for your child rather than on guilt for what you may have done wrong.

      3.  Give yourself and your child the gift of a relaxed home environment.

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  • How you and your Roswell, GA preschool can improve your child's brain development!

     For most families, parents and teachers/caregivers form the core of your child's early relationships. These relationships play a pivotal role in supporting and encouraging healthy brain development. ... Read More

     day_care_roswell_gaFor most families, parents and teachers/caregivers form the core of your child's early relationships. These relationships play a pivotal role in supporting and encouraging healthy brain development.

    • Love:  Extensive research has shown that a safe and loving environment fosters trust with parents and teachers. This encourages your child to become open to new learning experiences, and creates a strong foundation for future healthy relationships.
    • Safety: A secure and fully child-proofed environment allows your child to explore and develop a sense of independence. Discovering things in a positive, constructive way, builds self-confidence, self-awareness and fosters curiosity.
    • Nutrition:  Certain foods are rich in nutrients that actively support and assist brain development. Eggs are rich in choline, which supports the development of memory cells. Blueberries are brimming with antioxidants that keep your child's brain and body healthy. Lean beef and spinach are also brain super foods, supplying iron for boosting cognitive function and muscular development.
    • Stimulation:  Utilizing stimulating games and age-appropriate activities your child is encouraged to use different senses. Storybooks with images, toys and exploring the outdoors are also great stimulators. A trip to Roswell Area Park for a picnic is ideal, providing physical stimulation while allowing your child to explore and observe the world around him or her.

    Consider enrolling your child at Kids R Kids Learning Academy of Historic Roswell. Beyond the role of traditional day care, we offer your child the exceptional Brain Waves Curriculum. This program meets all your child's developmental needs, from eight weeks to five years old. Providing engaging learning activities and one-on-one interaction in a safe, loving environment, your child will thrive while enhancing cognitive, physical, social-emotional and language development. For more information on our exceptional programs and state-of-the-art facility, please contact us today.

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  • The Speed of Life

    "It goes by so fast." Without a doubt, the advice most often heard by any new mom is to take a minute and enjoy the infancy phase because it goes by too fast; to be honest, I grew tired of hearing it. I questioned how I could do anything BUT enjoy my little man. Don't get me wrong - I valued and looked forward to receiving the pearls of wisdom from those who had been there, and done that, but this little gem didn't sit well with me. After Micah was born, I was happy with the speed of our life. He was growing up and learning new things, but h... Read More

    "It goes by so fast." Without a doubt, the advice most often heard by any new mom is to take a minute and enjoy the infancy phase because it goes by too fast; to be honest, I grew tired of hearing it. I questioned how I could do anything BUT enjoy my little man. Don't get me wrong - I valued and looked forward to receiving the pearls of wisdom from those who had been there, and done that, but this little gem didn't sit well with me. After Micah was born, I was happy with the speed of our life. He was growing up and learning new things, but he didn't seem to be in a rush as he did that, and therefore, neither did I. Our family of three was perfectly content.

    When Micah was nine months old, I lamented how he had been alive for almost as long as I had been pregnant. I felt so lucky that the time hadn't sped by - that it didn't "fly" like everyone had warned. All those other parents were surely wrong. Maybe they just forgot to enjoy what they had in the moment. I couldn’t even remember what life had been like before he came along. But, yes, time was traveling at precisely the right speed.

    And then overnight, the speed of life changed. My baby was about to turn one. Where had time gone? During Micah’s tenth month, I was painstakingly aware of how close his first birthday was. My baby was no longer new. He was beginning to look big next to younger infants. His “new car smell” was almost completely gone. Why hadn’t I listened to all those parents to cherish every single moment of his life? How much time did I spend satisfied only to have it stolen before my very eyes? I wondered if I, too, had taken for granted the precious moments of a newborn baby.

    I asked myself, "How did I let this happen? Why didn’t I heed the warnings?" For a brief second, I might have felt angry and a little sad. But then it occurred to me that I was approaching a very important milestone. I had almost been a mommy for almost an entire year. I was almost an experienced mother myself. All those new babies in Micah's classroom belonged to mommies who needed advice. I looked forward to passing on the wisdom that had been gracefully handed down to me. I didn't waste another moment worrying about what I had lost. Instead, I began to embrace what I had gained - insight that can only come through loving a baby and watching him grow, insight that only a mommy could have.

    Now, I am more open to listening to the clichéd advice of other moms. I am a card-carrying member of the Mommy Club, and I take my responsibilities seriously. I promise to share every bit of mom-knowledge I have gained. So you should listen to me when I tell you not to blink. When I tell you that infancy goes by too fast, you should believe me. But I know that you won't. Trying to defy the odds is par for the course. You're on your way, Mommy!

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  • Three Parenting Resolutions for Any Time of the Year

    What's on your plate for the new school year? Many of us have the best intentions of cutting back on potato chips or Facebook time, but how about instead resolving to nix all the yelling, whining and power struggles that happen every day in our homes? That may sound like the impossible dream, but it's not!I'm Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I’m proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.Today, we're talking about three simple strategies for the new school year. I enc... Read More

    What's on your plate for the new school year? Many of us have the best intentions of cutting back on potato chips or Facebook time, but how about instead resolving to nix all the yelling, whining and power struggles that happen every day in our homes? That may sound like the impossible dream, but it's not!

    I'm Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I’m proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.

    Today, we're talking about three simple strategies for the new school year. I encourage you to resolve to do these three things for a more harmonious family within a few days.

    Resolution #1: I resolve to get everyone helping out around the house.

    Tired of the endless nagging it takes to get your kids to pitch in on even the smallest task? This year, make nagging a thing of the past. Instead, hold a family meeting to divvy up the responsibilities. Even 3 year olds can help sort socks and feed the pets, while a 12 year old can clean a bathroom or mow the lawn. Then, hold them accountable using appropriate consequences.

    Not only does this kind of system help take the load off your back, but also your children will pick up valuable skills and benefit from feeling capable and independent.

    Resolution #2: I resolve to make better use of routines.

    Some parents struggle with holding kids to bedtime and morning routines, but savvy parents will use them to the whole family’s advantage in the new school year. The key is to structure the routine so that all the business gets finished before the fun. For instance, if you have trouble getting kids out the door in the morning, refuse to dish up toast or eggs until beds are made, hair is brushed and backpacks are by the door. Dawdlers or protesters may end up missing breakfast, but you can be sure it won’t happen more than once or twice before they get the picture.

    Resolution #3: I resolve to spend one-on-one time with each child every day.

    If you only pick one resolution this school year, this is the one that will give you the biggest bang for your buck, and it’s called Mind, Body and Soul Time. By spending even ten minutes with each child every day, getting into their world, doing whatever they love to do, you’ll make emotional connections and give your kids a big dose of positive attention that they want and need.

    It's best if you can let your child pick the activity  - you even might find yourself constructing dinosaurs out of Play-Dohor wearing a tiara, but that's okay. You'll love the emotional connections you’ll build, and also love how cooperative your child will suddenly become after just a few days of Mind, Body and Soul Time.

    This school year, resolve to make these three changes in your family and get results you’ll enjoy for years to come.

    I'm Amy McCready for Kids R Kids, and I'll see you next time.

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  • 3 Tips for Nag-free and Tear-Free Mornings for Everyone

    With the new school year, parents are already dreading the endless nagging, pleading, negotiating and yelling that goes along with getting kids out the door on time. We’ll reveal three tips to help get your family out the door every morning, with no yelling required.I’m Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I’m proud to partner with Kids ‘R’ Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series. Today, we’re talking about morning mania. Ho... Read More

    With the new school year, parents are already dreading the endless nagging, pleading, negotiating and yelling that goes along with getting kids out the door on time. We’ll reveal three tips to help get your family out the door every morning, with no yelling required.

    I’m Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I’m proud to partner with Kids ‘R’ Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series. Today, we’re talking about morning mania. How do you get the kids out the door in the morning without the nagging, prodding, reminding and sometimes yelling that happens in so many households?

    It’s important to remember that kid priorities are not the same as parent priorities. Young kids especially are not concerned with getting out the door on time; they don’t really care if they wear clean underwear or have their hair combed – those are OUR priorities. We get into trouble when we try to rush our kids through OUR priorities.

    But you can take heart: there’s no need to face this struggle every morning. The following three tips (plus one bonus tip!) will help get your family out the door in the morning with everyone feeling good about the process, with no yelling required.

    1. Take time to emotionally connect in the morning.

    You can imagine what it’s like for kids who wake up without a care in the world to be rushed in a chop-chop way through OUR priorities of the morning routine. You’ll do yourself and your kids a world of good by taking time to emotionally connect before starting your morning routine. Staggering wake-up times slightly and spending just five minutes with each of your kids (one-on-one) to snuggle in bed, read a book or just be quiet together is a great way to emotionally connect in the morning. They need it and you do, too. It will get everyone off to a great start, and you’ll be amazed at how much more cooperative they are through the rest of the morning routine.

    2. Tame the morning nag-fest by implementing "when-then" routines.

    A when-then routine is a tool to help your kids stay motivated to get everything done in the morning—even the “yucky” stuff like brushing teeth and getting dressed. It structures your morning so that all the not-fun tasks are completed before the most desirable part of the morning, like breakfast (or morning playtime, TV time, etc.).

    Your family’s when-then routine, which you create in advance, might sound like, “When you’re dressed, your hair is combed, the bed is made, and your backpack and lunch box are by the door,then breakfast will be served.” If your kids show up to the table in pajamas with their hair a mess, you can smile and calmly say, “When everything in your morning routine is finished, then we’ll have breakfast.”

    Then simply walk away so you’re not available for whining or negotiating.

    3. Implement a no-rescue policy.

    If you consistently remind kids to remember the lunch box, PE clothes, homework, and permission slip, it’s time to implement a no-rescue policy.

    In parenting education circles, we remind parents, “A child who always forgets has a parent who always remembers.”

    If we always remember things for our kids or bail them out by driving the lunch box to school, there’s no reason for them to ever take responsibility and remember for themselves. Now we’re not talking about a “once in a blue moon” forgetting to take their coat or PE clothes. This is for consistent forgetting and consistent reminding on your part.

    But we can’t just spring the no-rescue policy on kids without warning. Set them up for success:

    Let them know in advance that part of growing up is taking responsibility for themselves and that you won’t be driving forgotten items to school. If they forget their homework or lunch box, they’ll need to face the consequences – they won’t starve, but I promise they’ll remember the lunch box the next day! There’s no doubt that this takes courage on your part, but remember you’re training your kids for the long term. Believe it or not, your kids’ teachers will thank you.

    Implement a process or a system to help them be successful. You can say, “Since I won’t be reminding you about what you need to take to school, what ideas do you have to help you remember?” A morning checklist that they see on the way out the door can be a great visual reminder. Removing yourself from the equation will help your kids be more independent and ensure your morning doesn’t turn into a nag-fest.

    Now – there’s an important Bonus Tip that can make all the difference in achieving the calm and relaxed morning routine you long for, and you can find that in the interactive that accompanies this video.

    These three strategies will work wonders to remove you and any nagging, yelling and reminding you’re prone to do from the situation each morning at your house and train your children to be more independent and responsible at the same time.

    Now, you can really look forward to tomorrow morning!

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  • What Your Toddler Wants You to Know

    Having a toddler can be a memorable occasion in your household if you understand how a toddler thinks.I am Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I am proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.

    Today, we’re talking about toddlers and what they want YOU to know about parenting.As difficult as the terrible twos and threes are for you, they are even more frustrating for your child. Not only is your little one encountering the world around her in a whole new way and beco... Read More

    Having a toddler can be a memorable occasion in your household if you understand how a toddler thinks.

    I am Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I am proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.

    Today, we’re talking about toddlers and what they want YOU to know about parenting.

    As difficult as the terrible twos and threes are for you, they are even more frustrating for your child. Not only is your little one encountering the world around her in a whole new way and becoming increasingly involved in it she is also learning a brand new language. Every day brings new sights, skills and emotions, and it would be a lot for even the most confident adult to manage. She needs your help to navigate the prides and pitfalls of her life as she becomes more independent yet she does not know she needs your help, let alone how to communicate it. If your toddler could articulate what she really needs, she might say something like this:

    “Mom, Dad, I know you guys are really frustrated and overwhelmed right now with my terrible twos. I am trying to let you know that although I am just a toddler, I need to be understood, and I need to be allowed to have a say in my life.

    Since you don’t get it and I don’t have the words to say it, all I can do is whine, refuse to cooperate, act helpless and throw tantrums. I am obviously not getting through to you so I will keep it up louder and more often. But I sure wish you would figure me out so I can stop acting like this.”

    There is a lot going on in your toddler’s mind right now. You can help her feel loved and empowered if you heed the following tips:

    3 Things Your Toddler Wants You to Know:

    1)Pay attention to me! And not just when I’m doing something wrong!

    “I have my ways of getting attention from you (remember that ill-fated display in the grocery store, or the time I got into your potting soil?). But what I really want is for you to give me the happy kind of attention -the kind we both enjoy- once or twice a day. And by the way, I can tell when you’re only “half-there” so can you leave your phone in your briefcase.”

    It may sound like a little thing, but taking time once or twice every single day to play with your child and give her your undivided attention means she won’t have to whine or act helpless for it. Ten to fifteen minutes, twice a day, is really all it takes. Consider it an investment –you will get that time back tenfold in good behavior since your child can count on getting the positive attention she needs.

    2)Let me have some control over my life.

    “Mom and Dad, you have been calling all the shots up until now: when I get up, what I wear, what I eat, when I go to bed. But now it’s time for me make more decisions during the day. Would it really hurt anything if I got to choose whether to wear sandals or tennis shoes, eat toast or eggs, or whether to use the Barbie or the Dora the Explorer toothbrush?”

    Here is a little secret from the treasure trove of toddler wisdom: there is a very good chance you can end the tooth brushing battle simply by offering a choice. And this applies to other power struggles as well. Every time you let your child make a decision, she feels like she has more control over her life. When she is given this kind of positive power, she won”t feel the need to throw tantrums or refuse to cooperate to get the control she’s constantly looking for.

    3)I can be capable and contribute, but you’ll have to teach me how.

    “I’m growing up and I want to do “grown-up” things. And you do way more things for me than you need to! If you take the time to teach me, I can probably pretty much dress myself and get my own snack as long as it’s not out of my reach. And that Swiffer® thing you push around? I sure would love to get my hands on that to help out!”

    Believe it or not, there are many tasks your toddler can take on to not only help you around the house but also feel important and valuable through the positive power she gains through these contributions. She simply needs you to teach her how to do them. With a little instruction, she can probably help set the table, match socks, feed the pet, and even wipe off counters with the help of a step stool. Training your child to help out in these ways and others will save you time in the long run and move your child toward empowering, age-appropriate independence.

    Believe it or not, it is possible for you and your toddler to get along even during this tricky time. By giving her the positive attention and positive power she needs, you can not only avoid a lot of the misbehaviors that drive both of you crazy but also help her prepare for even greater independence throughout her childhood.

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  • The importance of attending a Roswell preschool with AdvancED Accreditation

    Preschool plays an important role in your child’s growth and development. From mental growth and social skills to physical development, your child will greatly benefit from the right preschool. With each child being unique... Read More

    preschool_roswell_ga

    Preschool plays an important role in your child’s growth and development. From mental growth and social skills to physical development, your child will greatly benefit from the right preschool. With each child being unique it can be difficult to know which program is right for your child, however at Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academy of Historic Roswell, our AdvancED accredited program ensures your child will have the strongest start in life.

    What is AdvancED?

    AdvancED is an accreditation that meets the highest standards in education, which allows parents to feel comfortable with our program. Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academy of Historical Roswell meets or exceeds the high standards set by AdvancED. Our curriculum is filled with activities that are age-appropriate and that encourage children to achieve in all areas of development. With each child being unique, we adapt our teaching styles to suit each individual child so he or she can develop at their own pace.

    Our staff is highly qualified and follows child care development and technology trends to continually bring the best in care and education to your child. We realize that at times it can become frustrating to not understand your child’s behavior, so our philosophy of “Hug First, Then Teach” is designed to allow your child to learn in a caring, safe and secure environment. We will help guide him or her to learn about their behavior, and we will provide feedback to you.

    Lastly, your child will be immersed in hands-on, multisensory activities designed to maximize their development while still having fun. Our AdvancED Accredited preschool program will bring out the best in your child. Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academy of Historic Roswell looks forward to helping you unlock the possibilities within your preschooler so he or she can reach their full potential. Contact us today to learn more, or to enroll your child in our innovative program.

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  • A comprehensive look at infant child care in Roswell: From brain development to nutrition

    If you have a new baby on the way, it is not too early to consider your child’s first learning experience. An infant is at an incredible stage in life, as this is when learning takes place at an extremely accelerated rate. In order to ensure that your child receives... Read More

    child_care_roswell_ga

    If you have a new baby on the way, it is not too early to consider your child’s first learning experience. An infant is at an incredible stage in life, as this is when learning takes place at an extremely accelerated rate. In order to ensure that your child receives the most benefit during this time all of their needs have to be met, providing the perfect balance for exceptional brain development. These needs include:

    • Love and touch: Close, positive relationships with parents and caregivers create an environment of trust. By responding to your infant’s needs quickly and with warmth, your child learns to trust you and build the basis for healthy relationships. Hugs and tender loving care help to reinforce this trust, giving your child a sense of security.
    • Balanced stimulation: Stimulation through play, engagement and interaction causes neural connections to form which are the connections that your child will need for future learning. This stimulation has to be balanced by appealing to different areas of the brain, while avoiding overstimulation. If your child is avoiding an activity this may be a sign of overstimulation, and it might be wise to move on to another activity or give your child some time to rest. Similarly, your child’s learning should include activities that target different parts of the brain, while balancing this with nap times to help your infant cement newly formed connections.
    • Safe environment: An infant-proof environment with age-appropriate toys will help to keep your child stress free, comfortable and open to learning. Your child care center should be completely safe for your child and be access controlled. Interaction should be monitored to ensure that the child is gently treated, comforted and guided by experienced teachers.
    • Nutrition: Food provides fuel for the learning and development process, so it is important that all nutritional needs are met. An infant relies on breastfeeding or high quality formula for all nutrients, so the needs are fairly simple. As a child grows and begins to eat solid foods, introduce brain boosting foods like mashed berries, plain yogurt, eggs and avocados since these foods contain essential vitamins and nutrients. To find organic, 100% GMO-free fruits and vegetables that are packed full of taste and nutrients, visit the Roswell Farmer’s Market, which offers delivery for added convenience.

    At Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academy of Historic Roswell, we offer a unique infant learning program that puts the needs of your child and family first. From the age of eight weeks, your child can start a journey of incredible learning at our state-of-the-art facility where he can begin to develop cognitive, physical, social-emotional and language skills. Our teachers strive to create a loving relationship with every child in our care, offering balanced stimulation and nurturing care as your child interacts with teachers and peers alike. For more information on our advanced infant care program, please contact us today.

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  • Keeping Kids Safe Online

    What is the appropriate age for your child to have a cell phone? What are the rules and responsibilities for technology? How do you keep your kids safe online? These are important issues for parents of tweens and teens.I am Amy McCready with Positive Parenting Solutions and I am proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice Series. Today our topic is technology and the ground rules to put in place to keep your kids safe.Let's tackle the topic of cell phones first. We see kids as young as 8 and 10 with cell... Read More

    What is the appropriate age for your child to have a cell phone? What are the rules and responsibilities for technology? How do you keep your kids safe online? These are important issues for parents of tweens and teens.

    I am Amy McCready with Positive Parenting Solutions and I am proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice Series. Today our topic is technology and the ground rules to put in place to keep your kids safe.

    Let's tackle the topic of cell phones first. We see kids as young as 8 and 10 with cell phones now. Is that too young? You will know your child is ready for a cell phone when you can answer YES to the following questions.

    1. Does she need a phone? Are there times when she will be away from you, such as staying after school for sports? Is she in a carpool that requires her to coordinate rides and pick up locations?
    2. Will she demonstrate the maturity and responsibility to care for a phone by keeping it charged and not losing it?
    3. Will she adhere to your family rules for cell phone use without whining or badgering?

    If the answer to all three questions is yes, your child may be ready for a cell phone. But don't make the leap quite too quickly. If your child begs you for a cell phone, ask him to prepare a proposal on why he NEEDS one. Be very clear that "because everyone else has one" is not a good answer. Creating the proposal will foster his critical thinking and presentation skills. If you feel he has made a compelling argument and meets the 3 criteria I mentioned, it may be time to go phone shopping! Remember, he does not need a fancy phone - a bare-bones model will do the job.

    Let's talk about some ground rules for technology - cell phones, gaming devices, and computers. The most important thing to cover is that access to technology is a privilege, not a right. If kids don't adhere to your family rules for technology, the privilege goes away. Period.

    Here are a few family rules to consider:

    1. Require passwords to your children's email and social media accounts. Let your kids know you will periodically check their text messages, emails, and social media pages. It's not spying because you are giving them fair warning that you will be checking. Remind them it is your job to keep them safe.
    2. Your children must honor the technology curfew. Phones, computers and gaming devices must be turned off during meals and by 9:00PM each night (or earlier if your child is in middle school).
    3. Bedrooms are off-limits for technology. Require computers, gaming devices, and cell phones be used in public spaces and charged in a central area such as the kitchen.

    I am Amy McCready for Kids R Kids and I will see you next time.

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  • 4 Strategies to Avoid Clothing Battles

    Most parents can relate to the morning battle over what to wear to school. You cringe when she shows up at breakfast with a purple plaid skirt, a Mickey Mouse tank top that looks like it has been worn for days and green flip flops. Or maybe you selected the outfit the night before. Deep down you know there is no way in the world she is actually going to wear it. Now what?I am Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I am proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.Today, we are... Read More

    Most parents can relate to the morning battle over what to wear to school. You cringe when she shows up at breakfast with a purple plaid skirt, a Mickey Mouse tank top that looks like it has been worn for days and green flip flops. Or maybe you selected the outfit the night before. Deep down you know there is no way in the world she is actually going to wear it. Now what?

    I am Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I am proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.

    Today, we are talking about 4 simple strategies to avoid the power struggles related to clothing.

    1. Create Outfits: For younger children, pull outfits together on one hanger. Gather matching pants, shirt and socks, and clip them to one hanger. That gives her the power to choose her own outfit but gives you some peace of mind that it will not be a fashion disaster. It is also best if you can hang the rod at a kid friendly height so she can feel capable and independent by reaching it herself.

    2. Respect Sensory Complaints: Be aware that some kids are more sensitive to itchy tags, bulky seams and uncomfortable fabrics. If your son has a fit when you suggest he wear a certain type of shirt because the tag itches or the fabric feels icky on his skin, respect that and remove those clothing choices from the mix.

    3. Control the Environment: You can not control your child (at least not without a battle), but you can control the environment. If flip flops in February are out of the question, do not battle about them. Simply remove them from the closet so they are not among the available options for school clothes. If certain clothes are not appropriate for school, then have separate drawers or sections in the closet for school clothes and fun clothes. Give her the power to choose anything she wants to wear as long as it comes from the school drawer

    4. Let It Go: The very best strategy to avoid power struggles and foster independence is to let it go and allow your child to make her own clothing choices. You can provide some training about matching colors, but remember that fashion and beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. If she goes to school in plaids and stripes, who cares?

    It is much more important that she feel independent and powerful because she has some control over her day. Giving her the power to select her own clothes gives her a big hit of positive power that will go a long way in fostering self sufficiency and avoiding power struggles.

    If her choice does result in a fashion disaster, do not worry about what others think. Every teacher I know loves to see kids arrive for school in mismatched clothing because they know mom and dad recognize that child's need for independence and positive power.

    I am Amy McCready for Kids R Kids, and I will see you next time.

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  • Get Kids Helping At Home This Summer

    Just because kids are on summer break doesn't mean that you should be doing all the heavy lifting at home.All kids "toddlers to teens" should contribute around the house. Don't worry, this isn't child labor. It's going to be good for you and your kids. When kids contribute, they feel capable and empowered, they learn important life skills, and they learn the importance of family teamwork.Let's get right to the Top 5 Ways to Get Kids to Help Out:1. Take Time for TrainingBefore ... Read More

    Just because kids are on summer break doesn't mean that you should be doing all the heavy lifting at home.

    All kids "toddlers to teens" should contribute around the house. Don't worry, this isn't child labor. It's going to be good for you and your kids. When kids contribute, they feel capable and empowered, they learn important life skills, and they learn the importance of family teamwork.

    Let's get right to the Top 5 Ways to Get Kids to Help Out:

    1. Take Time for Training

    Before we can expect kids to help out at home, we have to Take Time for Training so they know WHAT to do and HOW to do it. (By the way, this is one of the reasons kids always seem more capable in the classroom than they do at home because teachers take the time to TRAIN kids on important tasks in the classroom.)

    Below you will find ideas for training opportunities by age. With all of these tasks, it is important to set kids up for success by breaking the training into small steps and allow your child to practice.

    Ages 2.5 to 4

    Wipe down chairs, tables with a damp sponge

    Pick up toys and clothes

    Meal Prep by tearing lettuce, chop cucumbers with plastic knife, cut banana slices for fruit salad

    Feed pets and pour water in bowl

    Clear dishes from table

    Use small, hand-held vacuum for spills and messes

    Fold small towels

    Ages 5 to 7 (All of the above, plus…)

    Wash dishes, load and unload dishwasher

    Help prepare lunch

    Swiffer the floor

    Make a list for the grocery store

    Sort laundry and transfer laundry from washer to dryer

    Fold simple items and put away own clothes

    Bathe pets

    Ages 8-11 (All of the above, plus…)

    Help change bed sheets

    Help wash and vacuum car

    Prepare snacks and light meals

    Run washing machine and dryer

    Change light bulbs and perform household projects (with parental supervision)

    Ages 12-15 (All of the above, plus…)

    Cook meals

    Grocery shop from a list

    Mow lawn (with supervision for younger ages)

    Wash windows

    Remember, training is a journey! It requires effort on your part but it will be worth it as you see your child become more capable and self-sufficient every day!

    2. Be Clear About Responsibilities

    After you Take Time for Training, Be Clear About the Responsibilities. Work with your child to make a list of her daily jobs. For kids who can not read, use pictures instead of words on your list. You can post the list on their closet door or on the fridge or better yet….

    Empower with a Clipboard!

    There is something about a clipboard that gives young children a grand sense of personal power. Empower your kids by putting their list on a clipboard and allow them to check each item as it is completed. It gives them a sense of accomplishment with each check they add to the list and most importantly, you do not have to remind or nag them about the jobs that have to be completed.

    You can keep a list on your computer and print a bunch of copies so you have them handy. Be sure to add a blank space or two for anything you want to add to the list.

    Daily Summer Jobs

    _____Make Bed

    _____Hang pajamas on hook

    _____Feed the puppy

    _____Fold the laundry (mom will leave basket by your door)

    _____Clean the patio table

    _____Make fruit salad for dinner

    _____ Other chore is added here

    3. Avoid Correcting and Encourage, Encourage, Encourage

    Chores vs. Contributions

    The biggest difference between a chore and a contribution is knowing that your efforts matter to someone else. Be sure to follow the Do and Do Not list below so your kids feel ENCOURAGED about their contributions.

    The Do Not

    Do not criticize. It is okay if the job is not perfect. The important thing is that your child made an effort!

    Do not re-do the job This is a big no-no! Adjusting the comforter after your child made the bed is guaranteed to discourage her from wanting to help in the future; and even though your perfectionist urges may be screaming when you see the big glob of peanut butter she missed when cleaning off the counter, let it go! (You can always do more training down the road to help your child improve her skills, but we do not want her to feel that she will never meet our expectations.)

    The Do

    Encourage ANY movement in the right direction! We are not going for perfection - we want to encourage the EFFORT!

    Do not feel that you have to wait until the task is finished, encourage him along the way. 

    Wow, I can see you are working really hard on that.

    Feel free to jump in and help your child every once in a while. It will model great teamwork in your family. 

    I love when you help me with my jobs. I would love for you to help me today.

    Let them know their efforts make a difference for you! 

    I know unloading the dishwasher can be a drag, but I want you to know how much that helps me, thank you!

    I really appreciate your teamwork!

    I would have never finished this job without your help today, thank you.!

    Your encouragement may not make them enjoy folding the towels any more, but it makes the task a lot more bearable knowing their hard work makes a difference to someone else.

    4. When-Then Routines

    We do not want daily responsibilities to turn into a power struggle so consider using when-then routines. When-then routines require that the yucky stuff (the tasks they do not enjoy) get done before the more fun parts of your day (like playing, TV and computer time, etc.) If you are consistent with When-Then Routines, the routine becomes the boss! There is no need to continuously remind or nag, the routine becomes the law. It is just the way we do it every day! Here are a few examples….

    Morning When-Then Routine:

    WHEN you are:

    dressed,

    your bed is made,

    your hair is combed and

    your backpack and lunch box are by the door

    THEN…we will have breakfast. But remember the kitchen closes at 7:30 a.m.

    If Jr. arrives in the kitchen in his pajamas on a school day, do not lecture or remind. Calmly tell him, It is so great to see him! When he is dressed and the rest of his morning list is done then we will have breakfast. If he wants to complain or argue, keep your smile, walk away and busy yourself with something else. When you disengage and walk away there is no one with whom to argue. It implies, there is nothing to discuss and I have complete faith you will get it done.

    Family Jobs When-Then Routine: WHEN your family jobs are finished, THEN you can play outside with your friends / have your TV or video time, etc.

    Bedtime When-Then Routine

    WHEN you:

    finish your bath

    are in your pajamas

    brush teeth and floss

    put clothes in laundry

    pick out clothes for tomorrow

    THEN…we will have story time and snuggles. But remember, lights are out by 7:30 p.m. (That requires that he hustles through the nighttime list so he has plenty of time for stories and snuggles.)

    Parents LOVE When-Then Routines! They motivate kids to get the yucky stuff done without Mom and Dad having to continuously nag and remind.

    5. Have a Back-Up Plan for Whining and Badgering

    Always have a back-up plan for whining and badgering.

    When kids roll their eyes and give a big sigh about doing family jobs, we can empathize. After all, we do not enjoy unloading the dishwasher any more than they do and we understand that it is not their favorite thing to do.

    However, we do not want to get sucked into a power struggle. 

    Why do I always have to do it? I did it yesterday. Jason never does anything around here. 

    Kids learn that they can get their way by whining, badgering and negotiating. Or, if they complain enough, Mom or Dad will do the job for them because that is less painful than enduring the griping and groaning.

    But, NOT THIS SUMMER!

    Once you have taken time for training, been clear about your expectations, encouraged rather than corrected, and used When-Then routines there is no reason to respond to whining and badgering. Just follow these simple steps:

    1. Reveal in advance how you will handle whining and complaining. Wait until a time when everyone is calm and relaxed and have a family chat about how you will handle whining and complaining. (Do not try to have this conversation in the middle of the whine-fest; it will just turn into a power struggle.)

    Simply tell him we have talked about our summer routines for helping around the house and I want you to know what a difference that makes for Mom and Dad. However, we have also noticed that there has been some complaining and arguing about the family jobs. So, in the future, (this is the reveal in advance part) if we hear whining or complaining or negotiating about the summer jobs, we are not going to respond. We are going to walk away.

    2. Practice the ignore and walk away. This is especially important for younger kids so they know what to expect. Do a role play in which your kids pretend to moan and groan about doing their jobs and you practice ignoring and walking away. Then switch roles and let your kids play the parent and you be the complainer! Let your kids practice the ignore and walk away.This is a great way to let them know what to expect.

    3. Implement when necessary. The next time your kids begin whining about their task, simply ignore and walk away! You will only have to do this a few times and they will quickly learn that there is no point arguing about it. Remember, if you respond in a way to the complaining, you are giving attention and power to that behavior which guarantees it will happen again!

    Your kids can express their dissatisfaction about helping out at home, but that does not require a response from you! Instead, ignore griping, groaning, complaining, arguing and negotiating and your kids will be contributing in no time.

    Have a fabulous summer and visit us often for more helpful solutions from the Kids R Kids Expert Parenting Advice video series.

    Amy McCready is the Founder of Positive Parenting Solutions (linked to site: www.positiveparentingsolutions.com) and the author of If I Have to Tell You One More Time (Tarcher/Penguin, August 2011).

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  • Summer Schooling: Make Learning Fun when School's Out!

    Kids love the lazy days of summer, but if your summers are too lazy, academics can suffer.I'm Amy McCready with PositiveParentingSolutions.com, and I'm proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series. Today, we're talking about how to make learning fun when school's out.Here are some startling statistics from the Johns Hopkins University Center for Summer Learning:On average students lose approximately 2.6 months of grad... Read More

    Kids love the lazy days of summer, but if your summers are too lazy, academics can suffer.

    I'm Amy McCready with PositiveParentingSolutions.com, and I'm proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series. Today, we're talking about how to make learning fun when school's out.

    Here are some startling statistics from the Johns Hopkins University Center for Summer Learning:

    On average students lose approximately 2.6 months of grade level equivalency in mathematical computation skills during the summer months.

    Teachers typically spend between 4-6 weeks re-teaching material that students have forgotten over the summer.

    There's no need for your kids to spend hours at the kitchen table doing worksheets this summer, but that doesn't mean learning has to stop.

    Children enrolled in the Kids R Kids Camp Nature Kids have the best of both worlds - non-stop fun and enriching learning experiences.

    In addition to structured camp experiences, you can make learning fun this summer with the following five strategies:

    1.  Make trips to the library part of your weekly routine. Pick one day or evening per week when you gather everyone up and head to the library. Included reading the library books as part of your kids' bedtime ritual. Ask open-ended questions like, "What do you think happened next?" to encourage their imaginations about how the story would continue.

    2.  Learn through cooking. Kids of all ages love to create in the kitchen. Let them help you make banana bread for snack time or mini pizzas for dinner. Not only will they have fun, they'll learn about fractions, shapes, food groups, and nutrition at the same time.

    3.  Vacation planning. If you plan to take a vacation this summer, encourage your kids to research your destination and particular spots of interest. They can check books out of the library or you can help them find information on the Internet. Visits to kid-friendly museums and exhibits while on vacation also keep learning fun.

    4.  Start a summer business venture. Not only will your kids learn the fundamentals of dog washing, lemonade selling or being a mother's helper (plus marketing, advertising, planning, and operations), they'll acquire some money sense when they decide whether to spend their earnings on candy or save it for the new game they've been wanting.

    5.  Channel your kids' creativity with Backyard Theatre. Encourage them to put on a play and invite the family and friends to watch. Your kids will love it and will learn everything from how to write a script to creating simple costumes.

    I'm Amy McCready for Kids R Kids and I'll see you next time.


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  • 3 Great Reasons to Play WITH Your Kids

    Most parents jump for joy when the time finally comes that their kids play independently or with their siblings.  Finally, a few minutes of breathing room to get a few things done around the house!While independent play is important for a child's development, it's also important to make sure that we are playing WITH our kids on a daily basis. I'm Amy McCready with Positive Parenting Solutions, and I'm proud to partner with Kids R Kids f... Read More

    Most parents jump for joy when the time finally comes that their kids play independently or with their siblings.  Finally, a few minutes of breathing room to get a few things done around the house!

    While independent play is important for a child's development, it's also important to make sure that we are playing WITH our kids on a daily basis. 

    I'm Amy McCready with Positive Parenting Solutions, and I'm proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice Series.  Today, we're talking about 3 Important Reasons to Play WITH Kids.

    Whether it's playing Pretend with a toddler or a round of Wii golf with a teenager, playing means doing whatever YOUR child likes to do.

    In addition to being fun, there are 3 great reasons to play WITH your kids:

    1.  Creating Emotional Connection: Playing WITH your kids - doing whatever it is that they like to do is one of the best ways to create emotional connection.  More than anything, your kids want your time - they want to be with you and play with you.  The good news is that it doesn't require a lot of time.  You can create those emotional connections by playing for 10 minutes once or twice per day.  You have to be fully present during that time - but you can foster the emotional bonds in as little as ten minutes per day.

    2. Fewer attention-seeking misbehaviors: We know our kids have an attention basket that MUST be filled - it's just the way we're wired.  When parents play WITH their children, they are PROACTIVELY filling the child's attention basket in positive ways.  If parents don't provide sufficient POSITIVE attention on a daily basis, kids will resort to negative behaviors to get it - whining, clinging, helplessness, sibling fighting, etc.  When parents implement consistent playtime WITH their children, attention-seeking behaviors begin to fall off the radar screen! 

    3. More cooperative children! As parents fill attention baskets in POSITIVE ways and emotional connections increase, children consistently become MORE COOPERATIVE at other times during the day!  When the child's core emotional requirements for connection and attention are met, he doesn't feel the need to fight us to get negative attention and is more cooperative when asked to do things throughout the day.  It's a win for everyone.

    I'm Amy McCready for Kids R Kids, and I'll see you next time!


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  • National Backyard Game Week

    Did you even know there was such a thing as National Backyard Game Week? How sad is it that to get families back to the basics, we have to have a week set aside? Regardless, it is a wonderful idea and from May 19 through May 26, we should all do just what the name indicates Celebrate National Backyard Game Week! For many generations, it was just a common occurrence for kids to head outdoors to the backyard and play in the sandbox and on the swing set. They played games of chase and hide-n-go-seek for hours on end, havin... Read More

    Did you even know there was such a thing as National Backyard Game Week? How sad is it that to get families back to the basics, we have to have a week set aside? Regardless, it is a wonderful idea and from May 19 through May 26, we should all do just what the name indicates Celebrate National Backyard Game Week!

    For many generations, it was just a common occurrence for kids to head outdoors to the backyard and play in the sandbox and on the swing set. They played games of chase and hide-n-go-seek for hours on end, having fun, laughing and believe it or not, they learned things along the way. On weekends and sometimes just randomly, mom and dad would join the kids out in the backyard to play games like Bocce, croquet and horseshoes.

    Today though, kids have computers and video games. Parents are often too busy working to pay for those things. The end results are nobody has time, or the desire, to go out in the backyard.

    Take advantage of National Backyard Game Week and get out in the backyard  to play games. Get some fresh air and exercise with family and friends. Years ago it was nothing for families to invite their neighbors over and the two families compete with each other or even better, adults against the kids!

    Get up and get outside folks! Find something physically and mentally stimulating whether it is playing classic games like Bocce, croquet or horseshoes or something new!


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  • 3 Reasons to NOT Pay for Chores

    Should parents pay kids for doing household chores?It only seems fair after all, you get paid for your job.  Shouldn't kids get paid to do their jobs around the house?  Not so fast on that one!I'm Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I'm proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.  Today, we're talking about 3 reasons NOT to pay kids for doing chores.Paying your kids for helping around t... Read More

    Should parents pay kids for doing household chores?

    It only seems fair after all, you get paid for your job.  Shouldn't kids get paid to do their jobs around the house?  Not so fast on that one!

    I'm Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, and I'm proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.  Today, we're talking about 3 reasons NOT to pay kids for doing chores.

    Paying your kids for helping around the house may seem reasonable at first glance, but think about it you may get paid for your job, but do you get paid for all the laundry, cooking, cleaning and yard work you do?  I don't think so! 

    You do those things because you are part of the family.  It's part of keeping the family functioning.

    If you've been paying kids for chores, here are the 3 reasons why you may want to reconsider that:

    1.  It sends the wrong message!

    Here's what Daniel Pink, author of The New York Times best seller, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, has to say about the subject:

    (Paying kids for chores) sends kids a clear (and clearly wrong) message: In the absence of a payment, no self-respecting child would willingly set the table, empty the garbage, or make her own bed.  It converts a moral and familial obligation into just another commercial transaction and teaches that the only reason to do a less-than-desirable task for your family is in exchange for payment.

    Wow, that's not the message we want to send!  We want kids to contribute because they are important, capable members of our family and everyone has to contribute - toddlers to teens.

    2.  It fosters an attitude of entitlement.

    When kids get paid to make basic contributions around the house, it reinforces that everything revolves around the child and that his personal needs are more important than the overall needs of the family. 

    Our goal is to foster an attitude of family teamwork.  If you live in our house, then everyone contributes.  When we pay kids to help out we undermine teamwork, and we contribute to the entitlement epidemic.

    3.  They're always looking for a raise!

    At first, your child may be motivated to do her family jobs for a quarter.  In a few years, she's demanding a dollar for the same jobs.  Eventually, she has absolutely no interest no matter what you pay.

    Don't worry.  You can still get kids to do their chores without paying them using much more effective Positive Parenting Solutions strategies.

    We do want kids to learn the value of money and the importance of saving, giving charitably and wise spending.  However, those important lessons can be taught with an allowance, which isn't tied to chores.  

    I'm Amy McCready for Kids R Kids and I'll see you next time!


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  • Strategies to Avoid Becoming a Helicopter Parent


    Helicopter Parents we've all heard the term that describes those overly controlling, high-strung moms and dads who hover over their kids, guiding their every move and protecting them from hurt and disappointment.  We watch other parents helicopter their kids and swear that we'll never do that but do your actions match your intentions?  Are you unknowingly helicoptering your kids? I'm Amy ... Read More


    Helicopter Parents we've all heard the term that describes those overly controlling, high-strung moms and dads who hover over their kids, guiding their every move and protecting them from hurt and disappointment.  We watch other parents helicopter their kids and swear that we'll never do that but do your actions match your intentions?  Are you unknowingly helicoptering your kids? 

    I'm Amy McCready with Positive Parenting Solutions, and I'm proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice series.  Today, we're talking about the risks of being a helicopter parent and simple strategies to avoid becoming one.

    We all have the hard-wired need to protect our kids and shelter them from pain, but hovering too closely, doing too much and jumping in on your kids battles and challenges have significant adverse effects on kids.

    In one of the best known studies on helicopter parenting, researchers from Keene State College in New Hampshire found that students who grew up with overprotective, helicopter parents tended to be less open to new ideas and actions, as well as more vulnerable, anxious and self-conscious compared with kids who had parents who kept a distance.

    Helicoptering starts with toddlers on the playground and can last into adulthood with negative results at each stage along the way.  Fortunately, there are things you can do to pack away the propellers for good.

    1.  Let your kids experience the natural consequences of their choices.  If your preschooler refuses to eat breakfast, rather than spoon-feed her on the way to school, let her experience the feeling of hunger.  She's not going to starve, and she'll be less likely to skip breakfast the next morning.

    If your son is between a  C and a B in math, don't go in and meet with the teacher to find out what extra credit he can do to get the higher grade.  Either let him experience the grade he earned or coach him on how he can make an appointment with the teacher himself to discover what, if anything, he can do to raise his grade.

    2.  Take time for training and turn over the reigns.  Take time to teach your kids- toddlers to teens to do grown up tasks to foster their independence.  Whether it's packing her own lunch or doing laundry start to finish, train on the step-by-step process for success, and then give her the responsibility.  Our kids aren't going to magically become responsible and self-sufficient.  We have to take time for training and give them the opportunity to sink or swim.

    3.  Don't step in to fix relationships.  Whether it's a sibling squabble or a disagreement on the playground, resist the urge to get involved.  If we always step in as judge and jury, or worse yet, contact the other parents on our child's behalf for every little thing that comes up, they'll never learn how to navigate the ups and downs of peer relationships.  If your child is having difficulty with a friend, talk it through and provide coaching, but let him handle it on his own and experience the outcome  positive or negative.

    I'm Amy Mccready for Kids R Kids, and I'll see you next time.


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  • Taming Public Tantrums

    Nothing invokes fear in the hearts of parents like an all-out public temper tantrum. You cringe as the eyes of other parents (or worse yet, the people without kids) are on you as they watch and wonder what magic you're going to pull to make it stop.I'm Amy McCready with Positive Parenting Solutions, and I'm proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice Series.  Today, we're talking public tantrums and how to prevent them in the first place and how to diffuse them if they do occur. You don't ... Read More

    Nothing invokes fear in the hearts of parents like an all-out public temper tantrum. You cringe as the eyes of other parents (or worse yet, the people without kids) are on you as they watch and wonder what magic you're going to pull to make it stop.

    I'm Amy McCready with Positive Parenting Solutions, and I'm proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice Series.  Today, we're talking public tantrums and how to prevent them in the first place and how to diffuse them if they do occur. 

    You don't need magic tricks, but before venturing out on your next public outing, consider these 5 strategies. You know they say that prevention is worth an ounce of cure. Our first few strategies will help you prevent the outburst in the first place.

    1. Give positive power. You can prevent tantrums and power struggles in general when you give your child plenty of positive power or control over his own world throughout the day. Give lots of choices throughout the day. Every decision means a hit of positive power. 

    2.  Give them a job. Prevent tantrums by planning ahead and giving kids important jobs to do at the grocery store. Take a clipboard and a crayon so she can cross off items as you put them in the cart. Kids who can count can be in charge of putting 5 oranges in the bag and selecting 2 green peppers. Instead of shushing them to be quiet so you can zip through the store, you'll all have a better experience if you plan ahead for ways to make your kids part of the process.

    3.  Have a backup plan for boredom. If you have a longer grocery outing planned, be sure to plan a few back-up activities.  You can purchase an inexpensive, handheld CD player and a book on CD or her favorite music ready to go for when she gets bored. 

    Do be sure that YOUR expectations are in check. It's unreasonable to expect a young child to sit patiently as you painstakingly compare the fiber content in brands of bread. Being prepared with a back-up plan will keep everyone happy. 

    Now, what happens if your best efforts at prevention fail and an all-out tantrum erupts?

    4.  Be unimpressed. Act like the tantrum doesn't bother you in the least. When you get tense and worked up, your child responds accordingly. In most cases, the child is having a tantrum to get his way or to get a reaction from you. So do the opposite, and don't give a reaction. By acting totally unfazed (even if it is just acting), it removes the payoff of attention and power for the tantrum, and it reminds your child that you're not going to jump through hoops and give into his demands to make the tantrum stop! It also allows you to calmly think through your plan of action so you can be more strategic in your approach.

    5.  Allow the tantrum to happen. Armed with your attitude of indifference, you want to calmly remove your child to a corner of the store where she can have her tantrum without the onlookers.  Or leave your cart, and calmly and without words, take her out to the car where she can have her tantrum. In this process, be sure to avoid eye contact, and don't give a lot of verbal feedback.  Remember, a tantrum isn't nearly as rewarding when we remove the audience. When parents try to talk the child down from the ledge or stop the tantrum, it reinforces that tantrums (especially in public) are a great way to get attention or to get mom and dad to jump through hoops to make it stop.  When your child is calm and ready to go back into the store, you can go.

    Remember, the very best strategy is avoiding the tantrum in the first place by giving lots of positive power and planning ahead with important jobs she can do while you're there.

    It's also important to know what kind of tantrum you're dealing with because they may be handled differently. 

    I'm Amy McCready for Kids R Kids, and I'll see you next time!


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  • Ending Entitlement Edpidemic

    Kids aren't born with an entitlement gene, but if you ask most adults, they'll say the sense of entitlement has reached epidemic proportions in today's youth.
    I'm Amy McCready with Positive Parenting Solutions, and I'm proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice Series.Today I'll share remedies... Read More

    Kids aren't born with an entitlement gene, but if you ask most adults, they'll say the sense of entitlement has reached epidemic proportions in today's youth.

    I'm Amy McCready with Positive Parenting Solutions, and I'm proud to partner with Kids R Kids for the Expert Parenting Advice Series.

    Today I'll share remedies to the entitlement epidemic so we can raise responsible, respectful, and resilient kids.

    The two biggest culprits for the entitlement epidemic are overindulging and pampering.

    No parent intends to raise an entitled child. It starts small when a toddler throws a tantrum in the store and mom buys a toy to keep him happy. He quickly learns if he throws a fit, she'll eventually give him what he wants.

    Entitlement also happens when parents pamper their kids and don't expect them to help out at home. Eventually these parents wake up and wonder why their teenagers are unmotivated and feel that the world owes them a living.

    Fortunately, there are simple measures we can put in place to put the brakes on the entitlement train:

    1.  Stop doing things for your kids they are perfectly capable of doing for themselves. Pick a day and make a list of things you do for your kids that, with a little training, they could do for themselves.  I'm not talking about a once in a while favor but things you consistently do for them.  For example, if you make the bed for your 4-year old every day, that's a job that she could do for herself with a little training.  Little by little, train your kids to do those tasks and turn over the reigns of responsibility.  How can we expect to have capable and responsible teens if we don't expect them to take responsibility as children?

    2.  Shut down the ATM and give your kids an allowance. Instead of reaching for your wallet every time you go to the store, let your kids know from now on, they can use their allowance to buy their own non-essentials like games, toys, and the like. 

    3.  Foster giving and gratitude. Counteract the it's all about me attitude of entitlement by making giving and gratitude part of your family culture.  Encourage your kids to give a portion of their allowance to your place of worship or a charity of their choice.  Create gratitude rituals by sharing what you are thankful for at dinner or help your child start a "gratitude journal" to record what she is grateful for on a daily basis.

    4.  Be the bad guy sometimes.  It's okay for kids to be disappointed or feel some discomfort as they tread through life.  In fact, it's downright necessary.  Resist the urge to make it all better and let your child face the little adversities of the day-to-day life of being a toddler to teenager.

    The practice of pampering and over-indulging are temporary fixes to ease short-term aggravation, and it hurts our kids in the long run.

    To put an end to the entitlement epidemic, begin with these four strategies. One day, believe it or not, your kids and the rest of society will thank you!

    For ongoing solutions to your parenting challenges, visit us often at Kids R Kids.com.

    I'm Amy McCready for Kids R Kids, and I'll see you next time!


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  • The Week of the Young Child

    Our Focus: Celebrating Families
    Each year, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) sponsors a week focusing on the importance of children. They choose a general topic and then ask each of us who are joining in the celebration to narrow the topic further.

    I had the amazing experience of focusing on this year general topic, Early Years are Learning Years, with my 2 girls as we enjoyed a sleepover at the Georgia Aquarium recently.  We spent 22 hours together without technology, homework, fr... Read More

    Our Focus: Celebrating Families


    Each year, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) sponsors a week focusing on the importance of children. They choose a general topic and then ask each of us who are joining in the celebration to narrow the topic further.

    I had the amazing experience of focusing on this year general topic, Early Years are Learning Years, with my 2 girls as we enjoyed a sleepover at the Georgia Aquarium recently.  We spent 22 hours together without technology, homework, friends, or toys. We enjoyed learning about science and animals; but, the most cherished time was during "lights out"  My two 9 year olds and I lay in our sleeping bags in a private cove, watching whale sharks and manta rays swim over head, and reviewed all that we had been taught throughout our guided adventure.  We had time to enjoy communicating with each other and remembering what was important in life. Our family and our connection is what I focused on as we eventually stopped talking and giggling and drifted off to sleep.

    This led to a narrowing of the NAEYC topic into one simple but very powerful word: family. Teaching our children daily as we unplug and spend time together is so important!

    Please join us in celebrating families and their diversity at the beginning of April! Look for more details to come!

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